A comparative study on transreactions induced phase changes in blends of poly(trimethylene terephthalate) and poly(ethylene naphthalate) upon annealing

Doan Ho Huang, Eamor Woo, Li Ting Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), thermal analysis, scanning and optical microscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses, this study has demonstrated that blends of two semicrystalline polyesters, poly(trimethylene terephthalate) and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PTT/PEN), were initially immiscible in as-blended state. The process of blend phase/morphology changes upon extended heating/ annealing at elevated temperatures was monitored and probed. With reactions induced at heating/annealing at high temperatures (300°C) for long enough times, the original two phases quickly merged into a single phase. NMR analyses have shown that the products of the transreactions are identified as the random copolyesters (termed as EN-TT). From the NMR results, statistical analyses revealed that the average sequence lengths decreased upon heating, and the degree of chain randomness increased with time of heating at the fixed temperature. Upon extended heating, all PTT and PEN chains could be fully transformed into random copolymers of higher randomness with only a single but amorphous phase. Results are compared to another blend system comprised of PEN and a homologous polyester, PPT, of different structure. Influence of polyester structure on transreactions and phase homogenization process is analyzed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)843-852
Number of pages10
JournalColloid and Polymer Science
Volume284
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 May 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

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