A Method for Measuring Rho Kinase Activity in Tissues and Cells

Ping-Yen Liu, James K. Liao

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) can regulate cell shape and function by modulating the actin cytoskeleton. ROCKs are serine-threonine protein kinases that can phosphorylate adducin, ezrin-radixin-moesin proteins, LIM kinase, and myosin light chain phosphatase. In the cardiovascular system, the RhoA/ROCK pathway has been implicated in angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, cerebral and coronary vasospasm, cerebral ischemia, hypertension, myocardial hypertrophy, and neointima formation after vascular injury. ROCKs consist of two isoforms: ROCK1 and ROCK2. They share overall 65% homology in their amino acid sequence and 92% homology in their amino kinase domains. However, these two isoforms have different subcellular localizations and exert biologically different functions. In particular, ROCK1 appears to be more important for immunological functions, whereas ROCK2 is more important for endothelial and vascular smooth muscle function. Thus, the ability to measure ROCK activity in tissues and cells would be important for understanding mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease. This chapter describes a method for measuring ROCK activity in peripheral blood, tissues, and cells.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSmall GTPases in Disease, Part B
EditorsWilliam Balch, Channing Der, Alan Hall
Pages181-189
Number of pages9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Sep 24

Publication series

NameMethods in Enzymology
Volume439
ISSN (Print)0076-6879

Fingerprint

rho-Associated Kinases
Tissue
Protein Isoforms
Lim Kinases
Myosin-Light-Chain Phosphatase
Coronary Vasospasm
Intracranial Vasospasm
Neointima
Amino Acid Sequence Homology
Cardiovascular system
Cell Shape
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
Vascular System Injuries
Cardiovascular System
Brain Ischemia
Actin Cytoskeleton
Vascular Smooth Muscle
Protein Kinases
Hypertrophy
Muscle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Liu, P-Y., & Liao, J. K. (2008). A Method for Measuring Rho Kinase Activity in Tissues and Cells. In W. Balch, C. Der, & A. Hall (Eds.), Small GTPases in Disease, Part B (pp. 181-189). (Methods in Enzymology; Vol. 439). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0076-6879(07)00414-4
Liu, Ping-Yen ; Liao, James K. / A Method for Measuring Rho Kinase Activity in Tissues and Cells. Small GTPases in Disease, Part B. editor / William Balch ; Channing Der ; Alan Hall. 2008. pp. 181-189 (Methods in Enzymology).
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Liu, P-Y & Liao, JK 2008, A Method for Measuring Rho Kinase Activity in Tissues and Cells. in W Balch, C Der & A Hall (eds), Small GTPases in Disease, Part B. Methods in Enzymology, vol. 439, pp. 181-189. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0076-6879(07)00414-4

A Method for Measuring Rho Kinase Activity in Tissues and Cells. / Liu, Ping-Yen; Liao, James K.

Small GTPases in Disease, Part B. ed. / William Balch; Channing Der; Alan Hall. 2008. p. 181-189 (Methods in Enzymology; Vol. 439).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Liu P-Y, Liao JK. A Method for Measuring Rho Kinase Activity in Tissues and Cells. In Balch W, Der C, Hall A, editors, Small GTPases in Disease, Part B. 2008. p. 181-189. (Methods in Enzymology). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0076-6879(07)00414-4