A novel adenylyl cyclase detected in rapidly developing mutants of Dictyostelium

Hyun Ji Kim, Wen-Tsan Chang, Marcel Meima, Julian D. Gross, Pauline Schaap

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disruption of either the RDEA or REGA genes leads to rapid development in Dictyostelium. The RDEA gene product displays homology to certain H2-type phosphotransferases, while REGA encodes a cAMP phosphodiesterase with an associated response regulator. It has been proposed that RDEA activates REGA in a multistep phosphorelay. To test this proposal, we examined cAMP accumulation in rdeA and regA null mutants and found that these mutants show a pronounced accumulation of cAMP at the vegetative stage that is not observed in wild-type cells. This accumulation was due to a novel adenylyl cyclase and not to the known Dictyostelium adenylyl cyclases, aggregation stage adenylyl cyclase (ACA) or germination stage adenylyl cyclase (ACG), since it occurred in an acaA/rdeA double mutant and, unlike ACG, was inhibited by high osmolarity. The novel adenylyl cyclase was not regulated by G-proteins and was relatively insensitive to stimulation by Mn2+ ions. Addition of the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-l-methylxanthine (IBMX) permitted detection of the novel adenylyl cyclase activity in lysates of an acaA/acgA double mutant. The fact that disruption of the RDEA gene as well as inhibition of the REGA-phosphodiesterase by IBMX permitted detection of the novel AC activity supports the hypothesis that RDEA activates REGA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30859-30862
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume273
Issue number47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998 Nov 20

Fingerprint

Dictyostelium
Adenylyl Cyclases
Genes
Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases
Phosphodiesterase 3 Inhibitors
Germination
GTP-Binding Proteins
Osmolar Concentration
Phosphotransferases
Agglomeration
Ions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Kim, Hyun Ji ; Chang, Wen-Tsan ; Meima, Marcel ; Gross, Julian D. ; Schaap, Pauline. / A novel adenylyl cyclase detected in rapidly developing mutants of Dictyostelium. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 1998 ; Vol. 273, No. 47. pp. 30859-30862.
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A novel adenylyl cyclase detected in rapidly developing mutants of Dictyostelium. / Kim, Hyun Ji; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Meima, Marcel; Gross, Julian D.; Schaap, Pauline.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 273, No. 47, 20.11.1998, p. 30859-30862.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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