A Rasch analysis of the Frenchay Activities Index in patients with spinal cord injury

Ching Lin Hsieh, Yuh Jang, Tzu Ying Yu, Wen Chung Wang, Ching-Fan Sheu, Yen Ho Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN. A prospective interview study. OBJECTIVE. To determine whether items of the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI) measure Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), as a unidimensional construct, in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). To examine whether the response categories of the FAI are useful in discerning the various ability levels of IADL. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. No known IADL scale has been designed for SCI patients. The FAI, to our knowledge, has never been validated in patients with SCI. METHODS. A total of 233 persons with SCI participated in this study. The FAI was administered to the patients by interview at locations convenient for the participants. A Rasch analysis was used to examine the unidimensionality and appropriateness of the response categories of the FAI. RESULTS. All but 2 items ("going outside" and "reading books") of the FAI fitted the model's expectations. The results of Rasch analysis indicated that the response categories for the remaining 13 items of the FAI should be collapsed to create more suitable response categories (4 items, into dichotomies, and the remaining 9 items, into trichotomies). Thus, a revised 13-item FAI was formed by deleting the 2 misfitting items and collapsing the response categories of the items. CONCLUSIONS. This study demonstrated that the revised 13-item FAI assesses a single, unidimensional IADL for SCI patients living in the community. The revised FAI shows potential for assessment of IADL in SCI patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-442
Number of pages6
JournalSpine
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Feb 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Rasch analysis of the Frenchay Activities Index in patients with spinal cord injury'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this