A registry-based case-control study of risk factors for the development of multiple non-fatal injuries on the job

C. Y. Li, C. L. Du, C. J. Chen, F. C. Sung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using compensation records of Taiwan, we conducted a case-control study nested within a cohort of 77,846 active workers who experienced at least one incidence of non-fatal work-related injury between 1994 and 1996 in order to explore factors associated with risk of sustaining multiple non-fatal injuries in the workplace. Cases (n = 2616) were workers with more than three incidences of non-fatal injury during the study period and controls (n = 3974) were randomly sampled from workers who experienced only one incidence of non-fatal injury during the same period. Compared with construction workers, workers employed in mining and quarrying (OR = 2.7), manufacturing (OR = 1.2), commerce (OR = 1.6), transport, storage and communication (OR = 1.3) and social, personal and community service (OR = 1.4) were all at significantly elevated risk of multiple non-fatal injuries. Both age and wage showed a significant dose-response effect on the risk of developing multiple non-fatal injuries. The preliminary analysis suggests that workers in certain industries are at significantly elevated risks of multiple work-related non-fatal injuries, in particular those in the mining and quarry industries. Additionally, further preventive measures should be aimed at protecting older workers from such injuries and further studies would help provide more specific interpretations on the positive association between higher wage earning and risk of multiple non-fatal injuries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-334
Number of pages4
JournalOccupational Medicine
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Jul

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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