A study of readmission during the first year of life among preterm infants with low birth weight

Yen Hsueh Tseng, Chung-Yi Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The aims of this study were to estimate the incidences of readmission for all causes and for respiratory infection among preterm low-birth-weight infants during the first year of life and to explore significant predictors for readmission. Methods: For this retrospective cohort study, we enrolled 18,421 infants born and first hospitalized in 2000-2002 because of prematurity or low birth weight (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 765) at discharge. The infants were identified from inpatient claims of our National Health Insurance. They were linked, by using scrambled personal identification numbers, to 2000-2003 inpatient claims data to identify all possible re-hospitalizations during infancy. Incidences of readmission, incidence density estimates, and predictors of readmission were analyzed. Results: Cumulative incidences of readmission for all causes and for respiratory infection were approximately 37.2% and 22.4%, respectively; respective incidence density estimates were 167 and 139 readmissions/100 person-years. Cox multivariate regression analysis indicated that male sex, birth weight <1,500 g, gestational age <28 weeks, congenital anomaly, chronic lung disease, and a parental insurance premium of <19,200 NT dollars were significant predictors for readmission. Conclusions: To reduce readmission rates among preterm low- birth-weight infants, perinatal and newborn regionalization must be enforced to improve the health of those at increased risk for readmission. Future studies should be performed to assess the effectiveness of healthcare maneuvers, such as administering antenatal steroid therapy to those who will be born early and providing surfactant to premature babies who are vulnerable to respiratory distress syndrome. Effective maneuvers such as these may further reduce readmission rates among infant born preterm. (Taiwan J Public Health. 2007;26(4):303-3U).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-311
Number of pages9
JournalTaiwan Journal of Public Health
Volume26
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Aug

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A study of readmission during the first year of life among preterm infants with low birth weight'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this