A versatile system for ultrahigh resolution, low temperature, and polarization dependent Laser-angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

T. Kiss, T. Shimojima, K. Ishizaka, A. Chainani, T. Togashi, T. Kanai, X. Y. Wang, C. T. Chen, S. Watanabe, S. Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have developed a low temperature ultrahigh resolution system for polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) using a vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) laser (h=6.994 eV) as a photon source. With the aim of addressing low energy physics, we show the system performance with angle-integrated PES at the highest energy resolution of 360 μeV and the lowest temperature of 2.9 K. We describe the importance of a multiple-thermal-shield design for achieving the low temperature, which allows a clear measurement of the superconducting gap of tantalum metal with a Tc =4.5 K. The unique specifications and quality of the laser source (narrow linewidth of 260 μeV, high photon flux), combined with a half-wave plate, facilitates ultrahigh energy and momentum resolution polarization dependent ARPES. We demonstrate the use of s - and p -polarized laser-ARPESs in studying the superconducting gap on bilayer-split bands of a high Tc cuprate. The unique features of the quasi-continuous-wave vuv laser and low temperature enables ultrahigh-energy and -momentum resolution studies of the spectral function of a solid with large escape depth. We hope the present work helps in defining polarization dependent laser excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy as a frontier tool for the study of electronic structure and properties of materials at the sub-meV energy scale.

Original languageEnglish
Article number023106
JournalReview of Scientific Instruments
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Mar 7

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Instrumentation

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