Acute symptomatic seizure disorders in young children - A population study in southern Taiwan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the incidence, etiology, and prognosis of acute symptomatic seizures in children by age 3 years. Methods: In a population- based birth cohort study of all 15,209 neonatal survivors born in Tainan City between October 1989 and December 1991, parents or caretakers of 13,493 children aged 3 years were surveyed by telephone regarding any provoked convulsive disorder, particularly acute symptomatic seizure, in the children; medical records were reviewed. Results: Sixty-three children (39 boys, 24 girls) had acute symptomatic seizures (incidence 0.46 in 100). The leading causes of acute symptomatic seizures were acute gastroenteritis, encephalitis/encephalopathy, and bacterial meningitis. Age-specific incidence was highest in the group aged 1-12 months. Intracranial hemorrhage, bacterial meningitis, and metabolic disturbance were the major causes of acute symptomatic seizures in children aged 1-12 months. Acute gastroenteritis, encephalitis/encephalopathy, and bacterial meningitis accounted for 85% of the causes in children aged 13-24 months, and gastroenteritis and encephalitis/encephalopathy were the predominant causes in those aged 25-36 months. By age 5 years, subsequent unprovoked seizures developed in 14% of the survivors of acute symptomatic seizures. Conclusions: Many acute symptomatic seizures are preventable. The risk of subsequent unprovoked seizures is determined by underlying precipitating factors. Public education regarding the danger of shaken-baby syndrome and excessive water supplement, as well as and nationwide vaccination against bacterial meningitis in young children, is necessary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)960-964
Number of pages5
JournalEpilepsia
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998 Sep 1

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Taiwan
Epilepsy
Seizures
Bacterial Meningitides
Population
Gastroenteritis
Brain Diseases
Encephalitis
Survivors
Incidence
Shaken Baby Syndrome
Precipitating Factors
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Telephone
Medical Records
Vaccination
Cohort Studies
Parents
Parturition
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Acute symptomatic seizure disorders in young children - A population study in southern Taiwan",
abstract = "Purpose: To determine the incidence, etiology, and prognosis of acute symptomatic seizures in children by age 3 years. Methods: In a population- based birth cohort study of all 15,209 neonatal survivors born in Tainan City between October 1989 and December 1991, parents or caretakers of 13,493 children aged 3 years were surveyed by telephone regarding any provoked convulsive disorder, particularly acute symptomatic seizure, in the children; medical records were reviewed. Results: Sixty-three children (39 boys, 24 girls) had acute symptomatic seizures (incidence 0.46 in 100). The leading causes of acute symptomatic seizures were acute gastroenteritis, encephalitis/encephalopathy, and bacterial meningitis. Age-specific incidence was highest in the group aged 1-12 months. Intracranial hemorrhage, bacterial meningitis, and metabolic disturbance were the major causes of acute symptomatic seizures in children aged 1-12 months. Acute gastroenteritis, encephalitis/encephalopathy, and bacterial meningitis accounted for 85{\%} of the causes in children aged 13-24 months, and gastroenteritis and encephalitis/encephalopathy were the predominant causes in those aged 25-36 months. By age 5 years, subsequent unprovoked seizures developed in 14{\%} of the survivors of acute symptomatic seizures. Conclusions: Many acute symptomatic seizures are preventable. The risk of subsequent unprovoked seizures is determined by underlying precipitating factors. Public education regarding the danger of shaken-baby syndrome and excessive water supplement, as well as and nationwide vaccination against bacterial meningitis in young children, is necessary.",
author = "Chao-Ching Huang and Chang, {Ying Chao} and Shan-Tair Wang",
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Acute symptomatic seizure disorders in young children - A population study in southern Taiwan. / Huang, Chao-Ching; Chang, Ying Chao; Wang, Shan-Tair.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 39, No. 9, 01.09.1998, p. 960-964.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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