Age differences in secular trends in black–white disparities in mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus among women in the United States from 1988 to 2017

Qianyu Guo, Meie Liang, Jiaoniu Duan, Liyun Zhang, Ichiro Kawachi, Tsung Hsueh Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine the age differences in secular trends in black–white disparities in mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) among women in the United States from 1988 to 2017. Methods: We used mortality data to calculate age-specific SLE and all-causes (as reference) mortality rates and black/white mortality rates ratios among women from 1988 to 2017. Annual percent change was estimated using joinpoint regression analysis. Results: We identified 10,793 and 4,165,613 black women and 19,455 and 31,129,528 white women who died between 1988 and 2017 from SLE and all-causes, respectively. The black/white SLE mortality rate ratio according joinpoint regression model was 6.6, 7.2, 4.4, and 1.4 for decedents aged 0–24, 25–44, 45–64, and 65+ years in 1988 and was 7.2, 5.9, 4.1, and 1.9, respectively in 2017. No significant decline trend was noted and the annual percent change was 0.3%, –0.7%, –0.2%, and 1.0%, respectively. On the contrast, the black/white all-causes mortality rate ratio was 2.0, 2.5, 1.8, and 1.0, respectively in 1988 and was 1.7, 1.3, 1.5, and 0.9, respectively in 2017, a significant decline trend was noted in each age group. Conclusions: Black adults, youths and adolescents had four to seven times higher SLE mortality rates than their white counterparts and the black–white disparities persisted during the past three decades. On the contrast, black women had less than two times higher all-causes mortality rates than their white counterparts and black–white disparities significantly diminish during the past three decades.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)715-724
Number of pages10
JournalLupus
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Apr

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology

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