Airway gas temperature within endotracheal tube can be monitored using rapid response thermometer

Shigeharu Nakane, Kennosuke Tsuda, Masahiro Kinoshita, Shin Kato, Sachiko Iwata, Yung Chieh Lin, Mihoko Mizuno, Shinji Saitoh, Osuke Iwata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Inappropriate preparation of respiratory gases is associated with serious complications during mechanical ventilation. To develop a temperature monitoring system of respiratory gases within the endotracheal tube, four newborn piglets were studied using an ultra-rapid-response thermometer attached to the closed endotracheal tube suction system. Respiratory gas temperatures were monitored at the mouth-corner level of the endotracheal tube using three thermocouples (Tairway, inserted into the endotracheal tube via the closed suction system; Ttube_centre and Ttube_wall, embedded within the endotracheal tube 0.5 mm and 1.6 mm from the tube wall, respectively). Univariate analysis showed that inspiratory Ttube_centre and inspiratory Ttube_wall were positively correlated with inspiratory Tairway (both p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed the dependence of inspiratory Tairway on inspiratory Ttube_centre and Ttube_wall and deflation of endotracheal tube cuff (p < 0.001, p = 0.001 and p = 0.046, respectively). Inspiratory gas temperature within the endotracheal tube can be monitored using a thermometer attached to the closed endotracheal tube suction system. Our system, with further validation, might help optimise respiratory gas humidification during mechanical ventilation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9537
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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