An alternative method of tension-free vaginal tape implantation for the treatment of female urinary incontinence

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Abstract

Aim: To present an alternative technique of implanting the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) to minimize the risk of bladder perforation or major pelvic injuries. Patients and Methods: Sixteen female patients with stress urinary incontinence were operated on. The procedure was performed under epidural/spinal anesthesia. A vaginal inverted U incision was made. Dissection was performed alongside the urethra bilaterally and the index finger bluntly dissected into the Retzius space after perforation of the endopelvic fascia. The TVT needle was passed through the lower abdominal wall guided by finger. The rest of the procedure was then finished up as originally described. Results: All patients underwent the operation smoothly without any bladder perforation or major pelvic injury. The mean operative time was 49 (range 32-87) min, and no patient had blood loss > 1100 ml. All patients could void satisfactorily within 2 weeks. Postoperatively, 94% of the patients (15/16) reported complete dryness, and 6% (1/16) significantly improved. At follow-up after 6 months, the dry rate was 87% (14/16) and the improvement rate 13% (2/16). The 24-hour pad test was significantly improved: preoperatively 112 ± 43 g; postoperatively 8.5 ± 4 g (p < 0.001). The maximum flow rate was not significantly reduced: preoperatively 27.1 ± 8.9 ml/s, postoperatively 24.6 ± 6.4 ml/s (p > 0.05). No patient had residual urine >50 ml. Conclusions: The reported technique offers an alternative way for TVT implantation. The intent is to minimize the risk of major pelvic injury and bladder perforation without compromising the surgical outcomes. Such benefit may outweigh the additional trouble of periurethral dissection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-54
Number of pages4
JournalUrologia Internationalis
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jul 21

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Suburethral Slings
Urinary Incontinence
Urinary Bladder
Therapeutics
Fingers
Dissection
Wounds and Injuries
Stress Urinary Incontinence
Epidural Anesthesia
Spinal Anesthesia
Fascia
Abdominal Wall
Urethra
Operative Time
Needles
Urine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

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title = "An alternative method of tension-free vaginal tape implantation for the treatment of female urinary incontinence",
abstract = "Aim: To present an alternative technique of implanting the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) to minimize the risk of bladder perforation or major pelvic injuries. Patients and Methods: Sixteen female patients with stress urinary incontinence were operated on. The procedure was performed under epidural/spinal anesthesia. A vaginal inverted U incision was made. Dissection was performed alongside the urethra bilaterally and the index finger bluntly dissected into the Retzius space after perforation of the endopelvic fascia. The TVT needle was passed through the lower abdominal wall guided by finger. The rest of the procedure was then finished up as originally described. Results: All patients underwent the operation smoothly without any bladder perforation or major pelvic injury. The mean operative time was 49 (range 32-87) min, and no patient had blood loss > 1100 ml. All patients could void satisfactorily within 2 weeks. Postoperatively, 94{\%} of the patients (15/16) reported complete dryness, and 6{\%} (1/16) significantly improved. At follow-up after 6 months, the dry rate was 87{\%} (14/16) and the improvement rate 13{\%} (2/16). The 24-hour pad test was significantly improved: preoperatively 112 ± 43 g; postoperatively 8.5 ± 4 g (p < 0.001). The maximum flow rate was not significantly reduced: preoperatively 27.1 ± 8.9 ml/s, postoperatively 24.6 ± 6.4 ml/s (p > 0.05). No patient had residual urine >50 ml. Conclusions: The reported technique offers an alternative way for TVT implantation. The intent is to minimize the risk of major pelvic injury and bladder perforation without compromising the surgical outcomes. Such benefit may outweigh the additional trouble of periurethral dissection.",
author = "Yat-Ching Tong",
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N2 - Aim: To present an alternative technique of implanting the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) to minimize the risk of bladder perforation or major pelvic injuries. Patients and Methods: Sixteen female patients with stress urinary incontinence were operated on. The procedure was performed under epidural/spinal anesthesia. A vaginal inverted U incision was made. Dissection was performed alongside the urethra bilaterally and the index finger bluntly dissected into the Retzius space after perforation of the endopelvic fascia. The TVT needle was passed through the lower abdominal wall guided by finger. The rest of the procedure was then finished up as originally described. Results: All patients underwent the operation smoothly without any bladder perforation or major pelvic injury. The mean operative time was 49 (range 32-87) min, and no patient had blood loss > 1100 ml. All patients could void satisfactorily within 2 weeks. Postoperatively, 94% of the patients (15/16) reported complete dryness, and 6% (1/16) significantly improved. At follow-up after 6 months, the dry rate was 87% (14/16) and the improvement rate 13% (2/16). The 24-hour pad test was significantly improved: preoperatively 112 ± 43 g; postoperatively 8.5 ± 4 g (p < 0.001). The maximum flow rate was not significantly reduced: preoperatively 27.1 ± 8.9 ml/s, postoperatively 24.6 ± 6.4 ml/s (p > 0.05). No patient had residual urine >50 ml. Conclusions: The reported technique offers an alternative way for TVT implantation. The intent is to minimize the risk of major pelvic injury and bladder perforation without compromising the surgical outcomes. Such benefit may outweigh the additional trouble of periurethral dissection.

AB - Aim: To present an alternative technique of implanting the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) to minimize the risk of bladder perforation or major pelvic injuries. Patients and Methods: Sixteen female patients with stress urinary incontinence were operated on. The procedure was performed under epidural/spinal anesthesia. A vaginal inverted U incision was made. Dissection was performed alongside the urethra bilaterally and the index finger bluntly dissected into the Retzius space after perforation of the endopelvic fascia. The TVT needle was passed through the lower abdominal wall guided by finger. The rest of the procedure was then finished up as originally described. Results: All patients underwent the operation smoothly without any bladder perforation or major pelvic injury. The mean operative time was 49 (range 32-87) min, and no patient had blood loss > 1100 ml. All patients could void satisfactorily within 2 weeks. Postoperatively, 94% of the patients (15/16) reported complete dryness, and 6% (1/16) significantly improved. At follow-up after 6 months, the dry rate was 87% (14/16) and the improvement rate 13% (2/16). The 24-hour pad test was significantly improved: preoperatively 112 ± 43 g; postoperatively 8.5 ± 4 g (p < 0.001). The maximum flow rate was not significantly reduced: preoperatively 27.1 ± 8.9 ml/s, postoperatively 24.6 ± 6.4 ml/s (p > 0.05). No patient had residual urine >50 ml. Conclusions: The reported technique offers an alternative way for TVT implantation. The intent is to minimize the risk of major pelvic injury and bladder perforation without compromising the surgical outcomes. Such benefit may outweigh the additional trouble of periurethral dissection.

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