An examination of age-related differences in attentional control by systems factorial technology

Cheng-Ta Yang, Shulan Hsieh, Cheng Ju Hsieh, Mario Fifić, Yen Ting Yu, Chun-Hao Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A recent study by Ben-David et al. (2014) indicated that older adults process redundant targets with a larger workload capacity than younger adults, even though older adults exhibit generally slower response times (RTs). To investigate the organization of mental processes that underlie age-related differences, we conducted four experiments with redundant-target tasks. In a series of discrimination-type redundant-target tasks (Experiments 1–3), we replicated the age-related capacity advantage; however, the differences were eliminated in a detection-type redundant-target task (Experiment 4). Our results supported the distractor inhibition account, which suggests that age-related differences were due to less efficiency in attentional control to resolve the response conflict when making discrimination decisions. Moreover, we conducted a simulation using a Poisson parallel interactive model, which assumes an inhibitory interaction between two parallel channels that is a result of a limited attentional capacity. An analysis of the model's predictions indicated the two key findings that may account for the age-related capacity differences: the older adults (1) processed the redundant targets with a higher decision criterion (i.e., more conservative in decision-making) and (2) exhibited a greater violation of context invariance (i.e., less degree of controlled attention in dealing with the response conflict). The extensive modeling analyses highlighted the effect of a decline in attentional control on age-related differences in workload capacity.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102280
JournalJournal of Mathematical Psychology
Volume92
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Oct 1

Fingerprint

Factorial
Workload
Decision Making
Technology
Mental Processes
Target
Decision making
Reaction Time
Young Adult
Experiments
Discrimination
Invariance
Efficiency
Experiment
Prediction Model
Response Time
Resolve
Siméon Denis Poisson
Conflict (Psychology)
Discrimination (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

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title = "An examination of age-related differences in attentional control by systems factorial technology",
abstract = "A recent study by Ben-David et al. (2014) indicated that older adults process redundant targets with a larger workload capacity than younger adults, even though older adults exhibit generally slower response times (RTs). To investigate the organization of mental processes that underlie age-related differences, we conducted four experiments with redundant-target tasks. In a series of discrimination-type redundant-target tasks (Experiments 1–3), we replicated the age-related capacity advantage; however, the differences were eliminated in a detection-type redundant-target task (Experiment 4). Our results supported the distractor inhibition account, which suggests that age-related differences were due to less efficiency in attentional control to resolve the response conflict when making discrimination decisions. Moreover, we conducted a simulation using a Poisson parallel interactive model, which assumes an inhibitory interaction between two parallel channels that is a result of a limited attentional capacity. An analysis of the model's predictions indicated the two key findings that may account for the age-related capacity differences: the older adults (1) processed the redundant targets with a higher decision criterion (i.e., more conservative in decision-making) and (2) exhibited a greater violation of context invariance (i.e., less degree of controlled attention in dealing with the response conflict). The extensive modeling analyses highlighted the effect of a decline in attentional control on age-related differences in workload capacity.",
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An examination of age-related differences in attentional control by systems factorial technology. / Yang, Cheng-Ta; Hsieh, Shulan; Hsieh, Cheng Ju; Fifić, Mario; Yu, Yen Ting; Wang, Chun-Hao.

In: Journal of Mathematical Psychology, Vol. 92, 102280, 01.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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