Anomalous effective viscoelastic, thermoelastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric properties of negative-stiffness composites and their stability

Yun Che Wang, Chih Chin Ko, Keng Wei Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Composite materials containing negative-stiffness inclusions embedded in positive-stiffness matrix may exhibit unconventional (anomalous) effective coupled-field properties through interactions of the two phases. Effective coupled-field properties are calculated with the finite element methods under the quasi-static assumption. Stability boundaries are determined by applying 10 Hz sinusoidal loading on boundary surfaces, and the system is unstable if its energy becomes divergent for a chosen inclusion Young's modulus ratio (λE) or bulk modulus ratio (λK). Effective viscoelastic properties and their stability are studied for negative λE at 10 Hz, while the Poisson's ratio of the purely elastic inclusion is kept constant. For small inclusion volume fractions, their stability boundary is at λE ∼ –0.3, and extreme large effective damping and viscoelastic modulus are in the unstable regime. Furthermore, in the viscoelastic case, inclusion shapes have no effects on stability. As for the effective coupled-field properties, all anomalous peaks are in the unstable regime for negative λE or λK, except for an anomalous peak in effective thermal expansion coefficient with electrically insulated inclusions. Insulated inclusions may cause charge accumulation at the inclusion-matrix interface and boundary surface effects may serve as stabilizing agents to the composite system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1640-1655
Number of pages16
JournalPhysica Status Solidi (B) Basic Research
Volume252
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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