Application of the polanyi adsorption potential theory to adsorption from solution on activated carbon. V. Adsorption from water of some solids and their melts, and a comparison of bulk and adsorbate melting points

Cary C.T. Chiou, Milton Manes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adsorption isotherms from water solution onto an activated carbon have been determined, both above and below the underwater melting points, for the following compounds: o-, m-, and p-nitrophenol; 2,5-dichlorophenol; coumarin; phthalide; 3,5-dichlorophenol; p-bromophenol; m-acetotoluidide; m-chloroacetanilide; and 2,2′-bipyridine. Of these compounds, adsorption isosteres on both sides of the underwater melting points have been determined for o- and m-nitrophenol, phthalide, and coumarin. The isotherms show distinctly higher adsorption on exceeding the melting points. The effect is ascribed to relatively inefficient packing of the solid phases into the carbon pores. The isosteres show first-order transitions at temperatures that are not detectably different from the underwater melting points and that are therefore taken as the melting points of the adsorbates. The identity of the bulk and adsorbate melting points is taken as evidence that the adsorbates are similar in their properties to the corresponding bulk phases. Except for the phenols, the adsorption isotherms of the liquids can be calculated by the previously published modified Polanyi adsorption potential theory, using gas-phase data on the same carbon, together with solute molar volumes and refractive indices. For the phenols (except o-nitrophenol), the theory underestimates the adsorption potential by about 20% and requires an empirical factor for each solute to account for the adsorption data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)622-626
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry
Volume78
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1974 Jan 1

Fingerprint

potential theory
activated carbon
Adsorbates
Activated carbon
melting points
Melting point
Adsorption
adsorption
Water
water
Phenols
isotherms
Adsorption isotherms
phenols
Carbon
solutes
Nitrophenols
carbon
Density (specific gravity)
Isotherms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

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title = "Application of the polanyi adsorption potential theory to adsorption from solution on activated carbon. V. Adsorption from water of some solids and their melts, and a comparison of bulk and adsorbate melting points",
abstract = "Adsorption isotherms from water solution onto an activated carbon have been determined, both above and below the underwater melting points, for the following compounds: o-, m-, and p-nitrophenol; 2,5-dichlorophenol; coumarin; phthalide; 3,5-dichlorophenol; p-bromophenol; m-acetotoluidide; m-chloroacetanilide; and 2,2′-bipyridine. Of these compounds, adsorption isosteres on both sides of the underwater melting points have been determined for o- and m-nitrophenol, phthalide, and coumarin. The isotherms show distinctly higher adsorption on exceeding the melting points. The effect is ascribed to relatively inefficient packing of the solid phases into the carbon pores. The isosteres show first-order transitions at temperatures that are not detectably different from the underwater melting points and that are therefore taken as the melting points of the adsorbates. The identity of the bulk and adsorbate melting points is taken as evidence that the adsorbates are similar in their properties to the corresponding bulk phases. Except for the phenols, the adsorption isotherms of the liquids can be calculated by the previously published modified Polanyi adsorption potential theory, using gas-phase data on the same carbon, together with solute molar volumes and refractive indices. For the phenols (except o-nitrophenol), the theory underestimates the adsorption potential by about 20{\%} and requires an empirical factor for each solute to account for the adsorption data.",
author = "Chiou, {Cary C.T.} and Milton Manes",
year = "1974",
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T1 - Application of the polanyi adsorption potential theory to adsorption from solution on activated carbon. V. Adsorption from water of some solids and their melts, and a comparison of bulk and adsorbate melting points

AU - Chiou, Cary C.T.

AU - Manes, Milton

PY - 1974/1/1

Y1 - 1974/1/1

N2 - Adsorption isotherms from water solution onto an activated carbon have been determined, both above and below the underwater melting points, for the following compounds: o-, m-, and p-nitrophenol; 2,5-dichlorophenol; coumarin; phthalide; 3,5-dichlorophenol; p-bromophenol; m-acetotoluidide; m-chloroacetanilide; and 2,2′-bipyridine. Of these compounds, adsorption isosteres on both sides of the underwater melting points have been determined for o- and m-nitrophenol, phthalide, and coumarin. The isotherms show distinctly higher adsorption on exceeding the melting points. The effect is ascribed to relatively inefficient packing of the solid phases into the carbon pores. The isosteres show first-order transitions at temperatures that are not detectably different from the underwater melting points and that are therefore taken as the melting points of the adsorbates. The identity of the bulk and adsorbate melting points is taken as evidence that the adsorbates are similar in their properties to the corresponding bulk phases. Except for the phenols, the adsorption isotherms of the liquids can be calculated by the previously published modified Polanyi adsorption potential theory, using gas-phase data on the same carbon, together with solute molar volumes and refractive indices. For the phenols (except o-nitrophenol), the theory underestimates the adsorption potential by about 20% and requires an empirical factor for each solute to account for the adsorption data.

AB - Adsorption isotherms from water solution onto an activated carbon have been determined, both above and below the underwater melting points, for the following compounds: o-, m-, and p-nitrophenol; 2,5-dichlorophenol; coumarin; phthalide; 3,5-dichlorophenol; p-bromophenol; m-acetotoluidide; m-chloroacetanilide; and 2,2′-bipyridine. Of these compounds, adsorption isosteres on both sides of the underwater melting points have been determined for o- and m-nitrophenol, phthalide, and coumarin. The isotherms show distinctly higher adsorption on exceeding the melting points. The effect is ascribed to relatively inefficient packing of the solid phases into the carbon pores. The isosteres show first-order transitions at temperatures that are not detectably different from the underwater melting points and that are therefore taken as the melting points of the adsorbates. The identity of the bulk and adsorbate melting points is taken as evidence that the adsorbates are similar in their properties to the corresponding bulk phases. Except for the phenols, the adsorption isotherms of the liquids can be calculated by the previously published modified Polanyi adsorption potential theory, using gas-phase data on the same carbon, together with solute molar volumes and refractive indices. For the phenols (except o-nitrophenol), the theory underestimates the adsorption potential by about 20% and requires an empirical factor for each solute to account for the adsorption data.

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