Association of environmental features and the risk of alzheimer’s dementia in older adults: A nationwide longitudinal case-control study

Chih Ching Liu, Chung-Yi Li, Shiann-Far Kung, Hsien Wen Kuo, Nuan Ching Huang, Yu Sun, Susan C. Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about the association between environmental features and the risk of Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). This study aims to investigate the association of physical and social environments with the incidence of AD. We identified 12,401 newly diagnosed AD cases aged ≥65 years in 2010, with the same no. of matched controls from National Health Insurance claims in Taiwan. Environmental data were collected from government statistics including three physical environments and three social environments. Multilevel logistic regression was conducted to calculate the odds ratios (OR) of AD in association with environmental features at the township level. Results showed that living in the areas with higher availability of playgrounds and sport venues was associated with a 3% decreased odds of AD (95% CI = 0.96–0.99), while higher density of elderly living alone was associated with a 5% increased odds of AD (95% CI = 1.01–1.11), after controlling for individual and other environmental factors. In further examination by urbanization level, the above relationships were found only in rural areas but not in urban areas. This study provides evidence that specific physical and social environmental features have different impacts on the risk of AD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2828
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume16
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Aug 2

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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