Associations between topical ophthalmic corticosteroids and central serous chorioretinopathy

A Taiwanese population-based study

Yuh Shin Chang, Shih Feng Weng, Chun Chang, Jhi Joung Wang, Jiu-Yao Wang, Ren Long Jan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To investigate the association between central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) and topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use. Methods. Data were collected from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, containing randomly selected medical claim data from 23 million residents in Taiwan. The study cohort comprised all patients diagnosed with CSCR between January 2001 and December 2010 (n = 2921) with a control group of patients (n = 17,526) matched to study patients according to age, sex, geographic region, and date of index medical care. Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and corticosteroid use (topical ophthalmic, oral, nasal spray, injected, and inhaled) within 1 year before CSCR diagnosis were examined using univariate logistic regression. Student's t-test was used for continuous variables. Adjusted logistic regression was used to compare the odds ratio (OR) of the prognosis of CSCR patients with that of controls. Results. In CSCR patients, we observed an increased prevalence of topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use (OR 6.328, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.786–6.921, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for age, sex, geographic location of the patient's residence, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, chronic renal disease, peptic ulcer, psychiatric disease, allergic respiratory disease, coronary artery disease, and corticosteroid use, conditional logistic regression analysis showed that CSCR patients were more likely to have used topical ophthalmic corticosteroids recently than the controls (OR 6.036, 95% CI 5.512–6.610, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Results strongly support an association between recent topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use and CSCR. Thus, patients who require ophthalmic corticosteroids should be advised of the associated risk of developing CSCR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4083-4089
Number of pages7
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Central Serous Chorioretinopathy
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Population
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Oral Sprays
Confidence Intervals
Nasal Sprays
Geographic Locations
Health Insurance
Hyperlipidemias
Peptic Ulcer
Taiwan
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Psychiatry
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Disease
Diabetes Mellitus
Cohort Studies
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Chang, Yuh Shin ; Weng, Shih Feng ; Chang, Chun ; Wang, Jhi Joung ; Wang, Jiu-Yao ; Jan, Ren Long. / Associations between topical ophthalmic corticosteroids and central serous chorioretinopathy : A Taiwanese population-based study. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2015 ; Vol. 56, No. 6. pp. 4083-4089.
@article{ffa9a12c741a4c33a12a312d7f8a9d1c,
title = "Associations between topical ophthalmic corticosteroids and central serous chorioretinopathy: A Taiwanese population-based study",
abstract = "Purpose. To investigate the association between central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) and topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use. Methods. Data were collected from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, containing randomly selected medical claim data from 23 million residents in Taiwan. The study cohort comprised all patients diagnosed with CSCR between January 2001 and December 2010 (n = 2921) with a control group of patients (n = 17,526) matched to study patients according to age, sex, geographic region, and date of index medical care. Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and corticosteroid use (topical ophthalmic, oral, nasal spray, injected, and inhaled) within 1 year before CSCR diagnosis were examined using univariate logistic regression. Student's t-test was used for continuous variables. Adjusted logistic regression was used to compare the odds ratio (OR) of the prognosis of CSCR patients with that of controls. Results. In CSCR patients, we observed an increased prevalence of topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use (OR 6.328, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 5.786–6.921, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for age, sex, geographic location of the patient's residence, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, chronic renal disease, peptic ulcer, psychiatric disease, allergic respiratory disease, coronary artery disease, and corticosteroid use, conditional logistic regression analysis showed that CSCR patients were more likely to have used topical ophthalmic corticosteroids recently than the controls (OR 6.036, 95{\%} CI 5.512–6.610, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Results strongly support an association between recent topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use and CSCR. Thus, patients who require ophthalmic corticosteroids should be advised of the associated risk of developing CSCR.",
author = "Chang, {Yuh Shin} and Weng, {Shih Feng} and Chun Chang and Wang, {Jhi Joung} and Jiu-Yao Wang and Jan, {Ren Long}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1167/iovs.14-16360",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "4083--4089",
journal = "Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science",
issn = "0146-0404",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Inc.",
number = "6",

}

Associations between topical ophthalmic corticosteroids and central serous chorioretinopathy : A Taiwanese population-based study. / Chang, Yuh Shin; Weng, Shih Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi Joung; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren Long.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 56, No. 6, 01.01.2015, p. 4083-4089.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between topical ophthalmic corticosteroids and central serous chorioretinopathy

T2 - A Taiwanese population-based study

AU - Chang, Yuh Shin

AU - Weng, Shih Feng

AU - Chang, Chun

AU - Wang, Jhi Joung

AU - Wang, Jiu-Yao

AU - Jan, Ren Long

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Purpose. To investigate the association between central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) and topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use. Methods. Data were collected from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, containing randomly selected medical claim data from 23 million residents in Taiwan. The study cohort comprised all patients diagnosed with CSCR between January 2001 and December 2010 (n = 2921) with a control group of patients (n = 17,526) matched to study patients according to age, sex, geographic region, and date of index medical care. Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and corticosteroid use (topical ophthalmic, oral, nasal spray, injected, and inhaled) within 1 year before CSCR diagnosis were examined using univariate logistic regression. Student's t-test was used for continuous variables. Adjusted logistic regression was used to compare the odds ratio (OR) of the prognosis of CSCR patients with that of controls. Results. In CSCR patients, we observed an increased prevalence of topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use (OR 6.328, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.786–6.921, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for age, sex, geographic location of the patient's residence, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, chronic renal disease, peptic ulcer, psychiatric disease, allergic respiratory disease, coronary artery disease, and corticosteroid use, conditional logistic regression analysis showed that CSCR patients were more likely to have used topical ophthalmic corticosteroids recently than the controls (OR 6.036, 95% CI 5.512–6.610, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Results strongly support an association between recent topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use and CSCR. Thus, patients who require ophthalmic corticosteroids should be advised of the associated risk of developing CSCR.

AB - Purpose. To investigate the association between central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) and topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use. Methods. Data were collected from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, containing randomly selected medical claim data from 23 million residents in Taiwan. The study cohort comprised all patients diagnosed with CSCR between January 2001 and December 2010 (n = 2921) with a control group of patients (n = 17,526) matched to study patients according to age, sex, geographic region, and date of index medical care. Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and corticosteroid use (topical ophthalmic, oral, nasal spray, injected, and inhaled) within 1 year before CSCR diagnosis were examined using univariate logistic regression. Student's t-test was used for continuous variables. Adjusted logistic regression was used to compare the odds ratio (OR) of the prognosis of CSCR patients with that of controls. Results. In CSCR patients, we observed an increased prevalence of topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use (OR 6.328, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.786–6.921, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for age, sex, geographic location of the patient's residence, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, chronic renal disease, peptic ulcer, psychiatric disease, allergic respiratory disease, coronary artery disease, and corticosteroid use, conditional logistic regression analysis showed that CSCR patients were more likely to have used topical ophthalmic corticosteroids recently than the controls (OR 6.036, 95% CI 5.512–6.610, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Results strongly support an association between recent topical ophthalmic corticosteroid use and CSCR. Thus, patients who require ophthalmic corticosteroids should be advised of the associated risk of developing CSCR.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84939785237&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84939785237&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1167/iovs.14-16360

DO - 10.1167/iovs.14-16360

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 4083

EP - 4089

JO - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

JF - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

SN - 0146-0404

IS - 6

ER -