Autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis

Shu Wen Wan, Chiou Feng Lin, Trai-Ming Yeh, Ching-Chuan Liu, Hsiao-Sheng Liu, Shu-Ying Wang, Pin Ling, Robert Anderson, Huan Yao Lei, Yee-Shin Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dengue is one of the most important vector-borne viral diseases. With climate change and the convenience of travel, dengue is spreading beyond its usual tropical and subtropical boundaries. Infection with dengue virus (DENV) causes diseases ranging widely in severity, from self-limited dengue fever to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Vascular leakage, thrombocytopenia, and hemorrhage are the major clinical manifestations associated with severe DENV infection, yet the mechanisms remain unclear. Besides the direct effects of the virus, immunopathogenesis is also involved in the development of dengue disease. Antibody-dependent enhancement increases the efficiency of virus infection and may suppress type I interferon-mediated antiviral responses. Aberrant activation of T cells and overproduction of soluble factors cause an increase in vascular permeability. DENV-induced autoantibodies against endothelial cells, platelets, and coagulatory molecules lead to their abnormal activation or dysfunction. Molecular mimicry between DENV proteins and host proteins may explain the cross-reactivity of DENV-induced autoantibodies. Although no licensed dengue vaccine is yet available, several vaccine candidates are under development. For the development of a safe and effective dengue vaccine, the immunopathogenic complications of dengue disease need to be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-11
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the Formosan Medical Association
Volume112
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 1

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Dengue Virus
Dengue
Severe Dengue
Autoimmunity
Virus Diseases
Dengue Vaccines
Autoantibodies
Antibody-Dependent Enhancement
Molecular Mimicry
Interferon Type I
Climate Change
Capillary Permeability
Thrombocytopenia
Antiviral Agents
Blood Vessels
Proteins
Blood Platelets
Vaccines
Endothelial Cells
Hemorrhage

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Wan, Shu Wen ; Lin, Chiou Feng ; Yeh, Trai-Ming ; Liu, Ching-Chuan ; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng ; Wang, Shu-Ying ; Ling, Pin ; Anderson, Robert ; Lei, Huan Yao ; Lin, Yee-Shin. / Autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis. In: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association. 2013 ; Vol. 112, No. 1. pp. 3-11.
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Autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis. / Wan, Shu Wen; Lin, Chiou Feng; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Wang, Shu-Ying; Ling, Pin; Anderson, Robert; Lei, Huan Yao; Lin, Yee-Shin.

In: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association, Vol. 112, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 3-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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