Beyond the imaginary relationship between western feminists and Third-World women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study reveals a postcolonial desire not only to redraw the boundary between western and Third-World women, but also to investigate the imaginary relationship, or rather, the psychological dynamics involved in western women's relationship with Third-World women. Rather than reduce the relationship between western women and Third-World women to a simple opposition; it attempts to understand the ambivalence in their relationship. This study is driven by my desire to understand how western feminists' seek to identify with Third-World women and how this can contribute to an understanding of postcolonial power relations and move beyond the assumed polarities of identity politics. I want to be able to think beyond a simple binary analysis of culpability and innocence and move toward an understanding of how differences among women can be seen to be enriching and valuable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-51
Number of pages20
JournalAsian Journal of Women's Studies
Volume1
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jan 1

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Third World
Western world
ambivalence
opposition
politics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

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Beyond the imaginary relationship between western feminists and Third-World women. / Yu, Su-lin.

In: Asian Journal of Women's Studies, Vol. 1, No. 13, 01.01.2007, p. 32-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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