Biomechanical investigation of dynamic hip screw and wire fixation on an unstable intertrochanteric fracture

Hsu Fu Wu, Chih-Han Chang, Gwo Jaw Wang, Kuo-An Lai, Chung Hwan Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Although use of a dynamic hip screw (DHS) for stable intertrochanteric hip fracture fixation has been successfully applied in fracture healing for more than 20 years, DHS fixation on unstable intertrochanteric fractures still has a high failure rate, especially in patients with osteoporosis. Although the wire fixation is usually incorporated with orthopedic device to treat fracture, the wiring techniques are developed through experiences. Thus, this study is objective to investigate the biomechanical property of different wire fixation methods incorporated with DHS system to provide the lesser trochanter fragment stable fixation on osteoporotic TypeA2.1 fracture for enhancing stability after bone reduction. Results: Sawbone testing results demonstrated higher maximum load, stiffness, and energy in a DHS with wire fixation compared with DHS fixation only. In static biomechanical testing of a cadaver femur, we compared the stiffness of five fixation models and then tested a fatigue failure model in cycle loading with DHS fixation only. Wiring fixation can enhance stability and the cut-out failure model in the fatigue test was identical to the clinical failure model. Conclusions: Lesser trochanteric fragment fixation is a crucial concern in the stability of an A2.1 unstable fracture, and the combination of a wiring technique with a DHS seems beneficial for achieving better stability. The addition of an antirotational greater trochanter is likely to enhance stability through wiring of the greater trochanter.

Original languageEnglish
Article number49
JournalBiomedical engineering online
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Apr 24

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Hip Fractures
Hip
Wire
Electric wiring
Femur
Fatigue
Fracture fixation
Stiffness
Fatigue of materials
Fracture Fixation
Osteoporotic Fractures
Fracture Healing
Orthopedics
Testing
Cadaver
Osteoporosis
Loads (forces)
Bone
Bone and Bones
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "Biomechanical investigation of dynamic hip screw and wire fixation on an unstable intertrochanteric fracture",
abstract = "Background: Although use of a dynamic hip screw (DHS) for stable intertrochanteric hip fracture fixation has been successfully applied in fracture healing for more than 20 years, DHS fixation on unstable intertrochanteric fractures still has a high failure rate, especially in patients with osteoporosis. Although the wire fixation is usually incorporated with orthopedic device to treat fracture, the wiring techniques are developed through experiences. Thus, this study is objective to investigate the biomechanical property of different wire fixation methods incorporated with DHS system to provide the lesser trochanter fragment stable fixation on osteoporotic TypeA2.1 fracture for enhancing stability after bone reduction. Results: Sawbone testing results demonstrated higher maximum load, stiffness, and energy in a DHS with wire fixation compared with DHS fixation only. In static biomechanical testing of a cadaver femur, we compared the stiffness of five fixation models and then tested a fatigue failure model in cycle loading with DHS fixation only. Wiring fixation can enhance stability and the cut-out failure model in the fatigue test was identical to the clinical failure model. Conclusions: Lesser trochanteric fragment fixation is a crucial concern in the stability of an A2.1 unstable fracture, and the combination of a wiring technique with a DHS seems beneficial for achieving better stability. The addition of an antirotational greater trochanter is likely to enhance stability through wiring of the greater trochanter.",
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Biomechanical investigation of dynamic hip screw and wire fixation on an unstable intertrochanteric fracture. / Wu, Hsu Fu; Chang, Chih-Han; Wang, Gwo Jaw; Lai, Kuo-An; Chen, Chung Hwan.

In: Biomedical engineering online, Vol. 18, No. 1, 49, 24.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lai, Kuo-An

AU - Chen, Chung Hwan

PY - 2019/4/24

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