Biomechanical study comparing biceps wedge tenodesis with other proximal long head of the biceps tenodesis techniques

Wei-Ren Su, Jeffrey E. Budoff, Chen Hao Chiang, Chi Ju Lee, Cheng-Li Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this biomechanical study was to compare the ultimate failure strength, stiffness, cyclic displacement, and failure displacement of 5 different proximal biceps tenodesis fixation techniques, specifically comparing wedge tenodesis with the other 4 techniques. Methods: Forty cadaveric shoulders underwent 1 of 5 long head of the biceps tenodesis techniques and were cyclically tested to failure by use of tensile forces applied parallel to the longitudinal axis of the humerus. A preload at 5 N was applied for 2 minutes, followed by cyclical loading for 500 cycles from 5 to 70 N at 1 Hz and a pull-to-failure test at 1 mm/s. The techniques studied were wedge tenodesis, suture anchor fixation, suprapectoral interference screw fixation, T-wedge tenodesis, and the percutaneous intra-articular transtendon (PITT) technique. Cyclic displacement, failure displacement, and stiffness were calculated. Results: The wedge tenodesis technique had an ultimate failure load similar to interference screw fixation and a greater ultimate failure load and stiffness than the suture anchor, PITT, and T-wedge techniques (P < .05). Conclusions: In this biomechanical study, wedge tenodesis was found to have an ultimate failure load similar to interference screw fixation and a greater ultimate failure load and stiffness than the suture anchor, PITT, and T-wedge techniques. Clinical Relevance: On biomechanical testing, wedge tenodesis compares favorably with other techniques and may be a useful clinical option for proximal biceps tenodesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1498-1505
Number of pages8
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume29
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 1

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Tenodesis
Suture Anchors
Joints
Humerus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Biomechanical study comparing biceps wedge tenodesis with other proximal long head of the biceps tenodesis techniques",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this biomechanical study was to compare the ultimate failure strength, stiffness, cyclic displacement, and failure displacement of 5 different proximal biceps tenodesis fixation techniques, specifically comparing wedge tenodesis with the other 4 techniques. Methods: Forty cadaveric shoulders underwent 1 of 5 long head of the biceps tenodesis techniques and were cyclically tested to failure by use of tensile forces applied parallel to the longitudinal axis of the humerus. A preload at 5 N was applied for 2 minutes, followed by cyclical loading for 500 cycles from 5 to 70 N at 1 Hz and a pull-to-failure test at 1 mm/s. The techniques studied were wedge tenodesis, suture anchor fixation, suprapectoral interference screw fixation, T-wedge tenodesis, and the percutaneous intra-articular transtendon (PITT) technique. Cyclic displacement, failure displacement, and stiffness were calculated. Results: The wedge tenodesis technique had an ultimate failure load similar to interference screw fixation and a greater ultimate failure load and stiffness than the suture anchor, PITT, and T-wedge techniques (P < .05). Conclusions: In this biomechanical study, wedge tenodesis was found to have an ultimate failure load similar to interference screw fixation and a greater ultimate failure load and stiffness than the suture anchor, PITT, and T-wedge techniques. Clinical Relevance: On biomechanical testing, wedge tenodesis compares favorably with other techniques and may be a useful clinical option for proximal biceps tenodesis.",
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Biomechanical study comparing biceps wedge tenodesis with other proximal long head of the biceps tenodesis techniques. / Su, Wei-Ren; Budoff, Jeffrey E.; Chiang, Chen Hao; Lee, Chi Ju; Lin, Cheng-Li.

In: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, Vol. 29, No. 9, 01.01.2013, p. 1498-1505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Biomechanical study comparing biceps wedge tenodesis with other proximal long head of the biceps tenodesis techniques

AU - Su, Wei-Ren

AU - Budoff, Jeffrey E.

AU - Chiang, Chen Hao

AU - Lee, Chi Ju

AU - Lin, Cheng-Li

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AB - Purpose: The purpose of this biomechanical study was to compare the ultimate failure strength, stiffness, cyclic displacement, and failure displacement of 5 different proximal biceps tenodesis fixation techniques, specifically comparing wedge tenodesis with the other 4 techniques. Methods: Forty cadaveric shoulders underwent 1 of 5 long head of the biceps tenodesis techniques and were cyclically tested to failure by use of tensile forces applied parallel to the longitudinal axis of the humerus. A preload at 5 N was applied for 2 minutes, followed by cyclical loading for 500 cycles from 5 to 70 N at 1 Hz and a pull-to-failure test at 1 mm/s. The techniques studied were wedge tenodesis, suture anchor fixation, suprapectoral interference screw fixation, T-wedge tenodesis, and the percutaneous intra-articular transtendon (PITT) technique. Cyclic displacement, failure displacement, and stiffness were calculated. Results: The wedge tenodesis technique had an ultimate failure load similar to interference screw fixation and a greater ultimate failure load and stiffness than the suture anchor, PITT, and T-wedge techniques (P < .05). Conclusions: In this biomechanical study, wedge tenodesis was found to have an ultimate failure load similar to interference screw fixation and a greater ultimate failure load and stiffness than the suture anchor, PITT, and T-wedge techniques. Clinical Relevance: On biomechanical testing, wedge tenodesis compares favorably with other techniques and may be a useful clinical option for proximal biceps tenodesis.

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