Blood coagulation and clot formation studies using high frequency ultrasounds

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study applied high frequency ultrasounds, up to 50 MHz, for better detecting the process of blood coagulation (BC) and clot formation (CF) using only a 5 m1 volume of blood sample. Measurements were carried out using various focused ultrasonic transducers of central frequencies ranged from 5 to 50 MHz Different hematocrits between 25 and 55% of the porcine blood were restituted from the separated plasma and red cells. A 2.5 ml calcium chloride was added into the blood sample for inducing clot formation. Per each measurement, backscattered signals of the blood digitized at a 500 MHz sampling frequency were collected for 30 minutes at a 1 A-line per second temporal resolution. Thus it allowed direct observation of changes of backscattered signals associated with process of BC and CF by both backscattered strengths and M-mode image. Results indicated that the backscattered strength was decreased initially corresponding to the addition of calcium chloride. The backscattered strength was increased gradually as more blood coagulated and was then saturated when the clot was finally formed. The rising time indicating the early stage of blood coagulation was found ranged from 212 to 35. seconds corresponding to the applied ultrasound frequencies from 5 to 50 MHz, respectively, meaning that high frequency ultrasound has a better sensitivity than that of the low frequency ultrasound. This discrepancy might be directly interpreted due to that ultrasonic backscattering is significantly dependent on the ultrasound frequency It moreover suggests that high frequency ultrasound is capable of sensitively examining the variation of the blood clinically.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1757-1760
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium
Volume3
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Dec 1
Event2004 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium - Montreal, Que., Canada
Duration: 2004 Aug 232004 Aug 27

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blood coagulation
blood
calcium chlorides
ultrasonics
hematocrit
signal measurement
temporal resolution
backscattering
transducers
sampling
low frequencies
sensitivity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

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title = "Blood coagulation and clot formation studies using high frequency ultrasounds",
abstract = "This study applied high frequency ultrasounds, up to 50 MHz, for better detecting the process of blood coagulation (BC) and clot formation (CF) using only a 5 m1 volume of blood sample. Measurements were carried out using various focused ultrasonic transducers of central frequencies ranged from 5 to 50 MHz Different hematocrits between 25 and 55{\%} of the porcine blood were restituted from the separated plasma and red cells. A 2.5 ml calcium chloride was added into the blood sample for inducing clot formation. Per each measurement, backscattered signals of the blood digitized at a 500 MHz sampling frequency were collected for 30 minutes at a 1 A-line per second temporal resolution. Thus it allowed direct observation of changes of backscattered signals associated with process of BC and CF by both backscattered strengths and M-mode image. Results indicated that the backscattered strength was decreased initially corresponding to the addition of calcium chloride. The backscattered strength was increased gradually as more blood coagulated and was then saturated when the clot was finally formed. The rising time indicating the early stage of blood coagulation was found ranged from 212 to 35. seconds corresponding to the applied ultrasound frequencies from 5 to 50 MHz, respectively, meaning that high frequency ultrasound has a better sensitivity than that of the low frequency ultrasound. This discrepancy might be directly interpreted due to that ultrasonic backscattering is significantly dependent on the ultrasound frequency It moreover suggests that high frequency ultrasound is capable of sensitively examining the variation of the blood clinically.",
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Blood coagulation and clot formation studies using high frequency ultrasounds. / Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Shyh-Hau.

In: Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, Vol. 3, 01.12.2004, p. 1757-1760.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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N2 - This study applied high frequency ultrasounds, up to 50 MHz, for better detecting the process of blood coagulation (BC) and clot formation (CF) using only a 5 m1 volume of blood sample. Measurements were carried out using various focused ultrasonic transducers of central frequencies ranged from 5 to 50 MHz Different hematocrits between 25 and 55% of the porcine blood were restituted from the separated plasma and red cells. A 2.5 ml calcium chloride was added into the blood sample for inducing clot formation. Per each measurement, backscattered signals of the blood digitized at a 500 MHz sampling frequency were collected for 30 minutes at a 1 A-line per second temporal resolution. Thus it allowed direct observation of changes of backscattered signals associated with process of BC and CF by both backscattered strengths and M-mode image. Results indicated that the backscattered strength was decreased initially corresponding to the addition of calcium chloride. The backscattered strength was increased gradually as more blood coagulated and was then saturated when the clot was finally formed. The rising time indicating the early stage of blood coagulation was found ranged from 212 to 35. seconds corresponding to the applied ultrasound frequencies from 5 to 50 MHz, respectively, meaning that high frequency ultrasound has a better sensitivity than that of the low frequency ultrasound. This discrepancy might be directly interpreted due to that ultrasonic backscattering is significantly dependent on the ultrasound frequency It moreover suggests that high frequency ultrasound is capable of sensitively examining the variation of the blood clinically.

AB - This study applied high frequency ultrasounds, up to 50 MHz, for better detecting the process of blood coagulation (BC) and clot formation (CF) using only a 5 m1 volume of blood sample. Measurements were carried out using various focused ultrasonic transducers of central frequencies ranged from 5 to 50 MHz Different hematocrits between 25 and 55% of the porcine blood were restituted from the separated plasma and red cells. A 2.5 ml calcium chloride was added into the blood sample for inducing clot formation. Per each measurement, backscattered signals of the blood digitized at a 500 MHz sampling frequency were collected for 30 minutes at a 1 A-line per second temporal resolution. Thus it allowed direct observation of changes of backscattered signals associated with process of BC and CF by both backscattered strengths and M-mode image. Results indicated that the backscattered strength was decreased initially corresponding to the addition of calcium chloride. The backscattered strength was increased gradually as more blood coagulated and was then saturated when the clot was finally formed. The rising time indicating the early stage of blood coagulation was found ranged from 212 to 35. seconds corresponding to the applied ultrasound frequencies from 5 to 50 MHz, respectively, meaning that high frequency ultrasound has a better sensitivity than that of the low frequency ultrasound. This discrepancy might be directly interpreted due to that ultrasonic backscattering is significantly dependent on the ultrasound frequency It moreover suggests that high frequency ultrasound is capable of sensitively examining the variation of the blood clinically.

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