Boron and strontium isotope ratios and major/trace elements concentrations in tea leaves at four major tea growing gardens in Taiwan

Cheng Ta Chang, Chen Feng You, Suresh Kumar Aggarwal, Chuan Hsiung Chung, Hung Chun Chao, Hou Chun Liu

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Isotopic compositions of B and Sr in rocks and sediments can be used as tracers for plant provincial sources. This study aims to test whether tea leaf origin can be discriminated using 10B/11B and Sr isotopic composition data, along with concentrations of major/trace elements, in tea specimens collected from major plantation gardens in Taiwan. The tea leaves were digested by microwave and analyzed by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The data showed significant variations in 87Sr/86Sr ratios (from 0.70482 to 0.71462), which reflect changes in soil, groundwater or irrigation conditions. The most radiogenic tea leaves were found at the Taitung garden and the least radiogenic ones were from the Hualien garden. The δ11B was found to change appreciably (δ11B = 0.38–23.73 ‰) which could be due to fertilizers. The maximum δ11B was also observed in tea samples from the Hualien garden. Principal component analysis combining 87Sr/86Sr, δ11B and major/trace elements results successfully discriminated different sources of major tea gardens in Taiwan, except the Hualien gardens, and this may be due to rather complicated local geological settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)737-748
Number of pages12
JournalEnvironmental Geochemistry and Health
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

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