Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after surgical repair of congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis

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Abstract

Although cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is rarely encountered, this condition can be serious after procedures that increase cerebral blood flow; most reports are related to carotid revascularization. Sharp cerebral hemodynamic changes, along with impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation, are the main mechanisms contributing to this syndrome. We report a patient who underwent surgical correction for congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and presented with postoperative hypertension, headache, impairment of consciousness, and cerebral edema 2 days after operation. He recovered well when the blood pressure declined and the brain edema subsided. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome was considered, and this uncommon neurologic complication of cardiac operations is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e51-e54
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume100
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Sep 1

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Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis
Brain Edema
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Consciousness
Nervous System
Headache
Homeostasis
Hemodynamics
Blood Pressure
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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AB - Although cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is rarely encountered, this condition can be serious after procedures that increase cerebral blood flow; most reports are related to carotid revascularization. Sharp cerebral hemodynamic changes, along with impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation, are the main mechanisms contributing to this syndrome. We report a patient who underwent surgical correction for congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and presented with postoperative hypertension, headache, impairment of consciousness, and cerebral edema 2 days after operation. He recovered well when the blood pressure declined and the brain edema subsided. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome was considered, and this uncommon neurologic complication of cardiac operations is discussed.

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