Characteristics of young children with developmental delays and their trends over 14 years in Taiwan

A population-based nationwide study

Der Chung Lai, Yen Cheng Tseng, How-Ran Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To describe the epidemiological characteristics of developmental delays (DD) at the national level and assess the changes over time. Design We calculated the incidence rates of DD from 2003 to 2016 and assessed the trends over time. Setting As dictated by law, local governments in Taiwan are required to register children with DD and provide services. The central government has constructed a national registry with the data from local centres. We analysed the national registry data. Participants We included children who were under 6 years old, and this population ranged from 1 164 150 to 1 577 443 per year during the study period. All registered cases were certified through a process set forth by law. Primary and secondary outcome measures We calculated annual incidence rates by age, sex and geographical area, and assessed trends over the study period. Results The incidence of DD in children under 6 years old displayed an increasing trend over the study period, ranging from 7.0 to 16.3 per 1000 person-years. Boys had higher incidence throughout all 14 years, and the boy-to-girl rate ratios had an increasing trend over time with some fluctuations, ranging from 1.84 (95% CI 1.77 to 1.92) to 1.99 (95% CI 1.93 to 2.06). In addition, rural areas had higher incidence rates, and the rural to urban rate ratios ranged from 0.98 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.03) to 2.00 (95% CI 1.94 to 2.06) without apparent time trends. Girls had a higher proportion of early reporting (<3 years) throughout all years, but the differences in the proportion of early reporting between rural and urban areas were not consistent. Conclusions Male sex appeared to be a risk factor for DD, which is unlikely to be due to more attention received by boys because girls had a higher proportion of early reporting. We also found that children lived in rural areas appeared to have a higher risk of having DD.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere020994
JournalBMJ open
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 1

Fingerprint

Taiwan
Incidence
Population
Registries
Local Government
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{4211fa7b8afb412e8c4de448a33ee7b9,
title = "Characteristics of young children with developmental delays and their trends over 14 years in Taiwan: A population-based nationwide study",
abstract = "Objectives To describe the epidemiological characteristics of developmental delays (DD) at the national level and assess the changes over time. Design We calculated the incidence rates of DD from 2003 to 2016 and assessed the trends over time. Setting As dictated by law, local governments in Taiwan are required to register children with DD and provide services. The central government has constructed a national registry with the data from local centres. We analysed the national registry data. Participants We included children who were under 6 years old, and this population ranged from 1 164 150 to 1 577 443 per year during the study period. All registered cases were certified through a process set forth by law. Primary and secondary outcome measures We calculated annual incidence rates by age, sex and geographical area, and assessed trends over the study period. Results The incidence of DD in children under 6 years old displayed an increasing trend over the study period, ranging from 7.0 to 16.3 per 1000 person-years. Boys had higher incidence throughout all 14 years, and the boy-to-girl rate ratios had an increasing trend over time with some fluctuations, ranging from 1.84 (95{\%} CI 1.77 to 1.92) to 1.99 (95{\%} CI 1.93 to 2.06). In addition, rural areas had higher incidence rates, and the rural to urban rate ratios ranged from 0.98 (95{\%} CI 0.94 to 1.03) to 2.00 (95{\%} CI 1.94 to 2.06) without apparent time trends. Girls had a higher proportion of early reporting (<3 years) throughout all years, but the differences in the proportion of early reporting between rural and urban areas were not consistent. Conclusions Male sex appeared to be a risk factor for DD, which is unlikely to be due to more attention received by boys because girls had a higher proportion of early reporting. We also found that children lived in rural areas appeared to have a higher risk of having DD.",
author = "Lai, {Der Chung} and Tseng, {Yen Cheng} and How-Ran Guo",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020994",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "BMJ Open",
issn = "2044-6055",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "5",

}

Characteristics of young children with developmental delays and their trends over 14 years in Taiwan : A population-based nationwide study. / Lai, Der Chung; Tseng, Yen Cheng; Guo, How-Ran.

In: BMJ open, Vol. 8, No. 5, e020994, 01.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characteristics of young children with developmental delays and their trends over 14 years in Taiwan

T2 - A population-based nationwide study

AU - Lai, Der Chung

AU - Tseng, Yen Cheng

AU - Guo, How-Ran

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Objectives To describe the epidemiological characteristics of developmental delays (DD) at the national level and assess the changes over time. Design We calculated the incidence rates of DD from 2003 to 2016 and assessed the trends over time. Setting As dictated by law, local governments in Taiwan are required to register children with DD and provide services. The central government has constructed a national registry with the data from local centres. We analysed the national registry data. Participants We included children who were under 6 years old, and this population ranged from 1 164 150 to 1 577 443 per year during the study period. All registered cases were certified through a process set forth by law. Primary and secondary outcome measures We calculated annual incidence rates by age, sex and geographical area, and assessed trends over the study period. Results The incidence of DD in children under 6 years old displayed an increasing trend over the study period, ranging from 7.0 to 16.3 per 1000 person-years. Boys had higher incidence throughout all 14 years, and the boy-to-girl rate ratios had an increasing trend over time with some fluctuations, ranging from 1.84 (95% CI 1.77 to 1.92) to 1.99 (95% CI 1.93 to 2.06). In addition, rural areas had higher incidence rates, and the rural to urban rate ratios ranged from 0.98 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.03) to 2.00 (95% CI 1.94 to 2.06) without apparent time trends. Girls had a higher proportion of early reporting (<3 years) throughout all years, but the differences in the proportion of early reporting between rural and urban areas were not consistent. Conclusions Male sex appeared to be a risk factor for DD, which is unlikely to be due to more attention received by boys because girls had a higher proportion of early reporting. We also found that children lived in rural areas appeared to have a higher risk of having DD.

AB - Objectives To describe the epidemiological characteristics of developmental delays (DD) at the national level and assess the changes over time. Design We calculated the incidence rates of DD from 2003 to 2016 and assessed the trends over time. Setting As dictated by law, local governments in Taiwan are required to register children with DD and provide services. The central government has constructed a national registry with the data from local centres. We analysed the national registry data. Participants We included children who were under 6 years old, and this population ranged from 1 164 150 to 1 577 443 per year during the study period. All registered cases were certified through a process set forth by law. Primary and secondary outcome measures We calculated annual incidence rates by age, sex and geographical area, and assessed trends over the study period. Results The incidence of DD in children under 6 years old displayed an increasing trend over the study period, ranging from 7.0 to 16.3 per 1000 person-years. Boys had higher incidence throughout all 14 years, and the boy-to-girl rate ratios had an increasing trend over time with some fluctuations, ranging from 1.84 (95% CI 1.77 to 1.92) to 1.99 (95% CI 1.93 to 2.06). In addition, rural areas had higher incidence rates, and the rural to urban rate ratios ranged from 0.98 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.03) to 2.00 (95% CI 1.94 to 2.06) without apparent time trends. Girls had a higher proportion of early reporting (<3 years) throughout all years, but the differences in the proportion of early reporting between rural and urban areas were not consistent. Conclusions Male sex appeared to be a risk factor for DD, which is unlikely to be due to more attention received by boys because girls had a higher proportion of early reporting. We also found that children lived in rural areas appeared to have a higher risk of having DD.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052986213&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85052986213&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020994

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020994

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 5

M1 - e020994

ER -