Community-acquired anaerobic bacteremia in adults

One-year experience in a medical center

Min Nan Hung, Shey Ying Chen, Jiun-Ling Wang, Shan Chwen Chang, Po Ren Hsueh, Chun Hsing Liao, Yee Chun Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A prospective observational study was conducted to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcome of community-acquired anaerobic bacteremia. From June 1 2001 through May 31 2002, 52 patients with community-acquired anaerobic bacteremia were enrolled at the emergency department in a teaching hospital. There were 19 patients (34%) with polymicrobial bacteremia and Escherichia coli was the most common copathogen (n = 6). Of 62 anaerobic isolates, species of the Bacteroides fragilis group were the most common isolates (n = 28, 45%), followed by Clostridium spp. (n = 11, 18%). Among the 52 patients enrolled, up to 27% had underlying malignancy and the gastrointestinal tract accounted for 48% of the sources of infection. Clinical manifestations suggesting anaerobic infections were common and three-quarters (n = 39) of 52 patients received adequate empirical antimicrobial treatment. Documentation of anaerobic bacteremia seldom influenced antimicrobial treatment. The 30-day mortality was 25%. Although univariate analysis revealed that underlying malignancy (p=0.003), leukopenia (p=0.044) and absence of fever (p=0.047) were associated with mortality, only malignancy (p=0.007) was an independent risk factor in the multivariate analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)436-443
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection
Volume38
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Bacteremia
Bacteroides fragilis
Neoplasms
Clostridium
Mortality
Leukopenia
Infection
Teaching Hospitals
Documentation
Observational Studies
Gastrointestinal Tract
Hospital Emergency Service
Fever
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Escherichia coli
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Hung, M. N., Chen, S. Y., Wang, J-L., Chang, S. C., Hsueh, P. R., Liao, C. H., & Chen, Y. C. (2005). Community-acquired anaerobic bacteremia in adults: One-year experience in a medical center. Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection, 38(6), 436-443.
Hung, Min Nan ; Chen, Shey Ying ; Wang, Jiun-Ling ; Chang, Shan Chwen ; Hsueh, Po Ren ; Liao, Chun Hsing ; Chen, Yee Chun. / Community-acquired anaerobic bacteremia in adults : One-year experience in a medical center. In: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection. 2005 ; Vol. 38, No. 6. pp. 436-443.
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abstract = "A prospective observational study was conducted to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcome of community-acquired anaerobic bacteremia. From June 1 2001 through May 31 2002, 52 patients with community-acquired anaerobic bacteremia were enrolled at the emergency department in a teaching hospital. There were 19 patients (34{\%}) with polymicrobial bacteremia and Escherichia coli was the most common copathogen (n = 6). Of 62 anaerobic isolates, species of the Bacteroides fragilis group were the most common isolates (n = 28, 45{\%}), followed by Clostridium spp. (n = 11, 18{\%}). Among the 52 patients enrolled, up to 27{\%} had underlying malignancy and the gastrointestinal tract accounted for 48{\%} of the sources of infection. Clinical manifestations suggesting anaerobic infections were common and three-quarters (n = 39) of 52 patients received adequate empirical antimicrobial treatment. Documentation of anaerobic bacteremia seldom influenced antimicrobial treatment. The 30-day mortality was 25{\%}. Although univariate analysis revealed that underlying malignancy (p=0.003), leukopenia (p=0.044) and absence of fever (p=0.047) were associated with mortality, only malignancy (p=0.007) was an independent risk factor in the multivariate analysis.",
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Hung, MN, Chen, SY, Wang, J-L, Chang, SC, Hsueh, PR, Liao, CH & Chen, YC 2005, 'Community-acquired anaerobic bacteremia in adults: One-year experience in a medical center', Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection, vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 436-443.

Community-acquired anaerobic bacteremia in adults : One-year experience in a medical center. / Hung, Min Nan; Chen, Shey Ying; Wang, Jiun-Ling; Chang, Shan Chwen; Hsueh, Po Ren; Liao, Chun Hsing; Chen, Yee Chun.

In: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection, Vol. 38, No. 6, 01.12.2005, p. 436-443.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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