Comparison of emergency medical services systems in the pan-Asian resuscitation outcomes study countries

Report from a literature review and survey

Marcus Eh Ong, Jungheum Cho, Matthew Huei Ming Ma, Hideharu Tanaka, Tatsuya Nishiuchi, Omer Al Sakaf, Sarah Abdul Karim, Nalinas Khunkhlai, Ridvan Atilla, Chih-Hao Lin, Nur Shahidah, Desiree Lie, Sang Do Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Asia-Pacific countries have unique prehospital emergency care or emergency medical services (EMS) systems, which are different from European or Anglo-American models. We aimed to compare the EMS systems of eight Asia-Pacific countries/regions as part of the Pan Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study (PAROS), to provide a basis for future comparative studies across systems of care. Methods: In the first phase, a systematic literature review of EMS system within the eight PAROS countries/regions of interest was conducted. In the second phase, PAROS site directors were surveyed for additional information about the demographics and characteristics of EMS services at their sites. Results: The database and bibliography search identified 25 eligible articles. The survey of EMS systems was completed by seven PAROS directors. By combining information sources from phases 1 and 2, we found that all PAROS EMS systems were single-tiered, and most were public (vs private) and fire-based (Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan, Korea). Ambulance personnel were primarily emergency medical technicians and paramedics, except for Thailand and Turkey, whose personnel include nurses and physicians. Personnel were trained to use automated external defibrillators and have basic cardiac life support certification. The service capability of each EMS system in terms of dispatch, airway management and medications, for example, varied greatly. Conclusion: We found variation in the EMS systems across the eight Asia-Pacific countries/regions studied. The findings will inform the construction of a multinational Asia-Pacific research network for future comparative studies and could serve as a model for international research networks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-63
Number of pages9
JournalEMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb 1

Fingerprint

Emergency Medical Services
Resuscitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Thailand
Emergency Medical Technicians
Surveys and Questionnaires
Allied Health Personnel
Airway Management
Ambulances
Defibrillators
Malaysia
Singapore
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Certification
Bibliography
Korea
Turkey
Taiwan
Research
Japan

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Ong, Marcus Eh ; Cho, Jungheum ; Ma, Matthew Huei Ming ; Tanaka, Hideharu ; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya ; Al Sakaf, Omer ; Abdul Karim, Sarah ; Khunkhlai, Nalinas ; Atilla, Ridvan ; Lin, Chih-Hao ; Shahidah, Nur ; Lie, Desiree ; Shin, Sang Do. / Comparison of emergency medical services systems in the pan-Asian resuscitation outcomes study countries : Report from a literature review and survey. In: EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 55-63.
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Ong, ME, Cho, J, Ma, MHM, Tanaka, H, Nishiuchi, T, Al Sakaf, O, Abdul Karim, S, Khunkhlai, N, Atilla, R, Lin, C-H, Shahidah, N, Lie, D & Shin, SD 2013, 'Comparison of emergency medical services systems in the pan-Asian resuscitation outcomes study countries: Report from a literature review and survey', EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 55-63. https://doi.org/10.1111/1742-6723.12032

Comparison of emergency medical services systems in the pan-Asian resuscitation outcomes study countries : Report from a literature review and survey. / Ong, Marcus Eh; Cho, Jungheum; Ma, Matthew Huei Ming; Tanaka, Hideharu; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Al Sakaf, Omer; Abdul Karim, Sarah; Khunkhlai, Nalinas; Atilla, Ridvan; Lin, Chih-Hao; Shahidah, Nur; Lie, Desiree; Shin, Sang Do.

In: EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.02.2013, p. 55-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Comparison of emergency medical services systems in the pan-Asian resuscitation outcomes study countries

T2 - Report from a literature review and survey

AU - Ong, Marcus Eh

AU - Cho, Jungheum

AU - Ma, Matthew Huei Ming

AU - Tanaka, Hideharu

AU - Nishiuchi, Tatsuya

AU - Al Sakaf, Omer

AU - Abdul Karim, Sarah

AU - Khunkhlai, Nalinas

AU - Atilla, Ridvan

AU - Lin, Chih-Hao

AU - Shahidah, Nur

AU - Lie, Desiree

AU - Shin, Sang Do

PY - 2013/2/1

Y1 - 2013/2/1

N2 - Objective: Asia-Pacific countries have unique prehospital emergency care or emergency medical services (EMS) systems, which are different from European or Anglo-American models. We aimed to compare the EMS systems of eight Asia-Pacific countries/regions as part of the Pan Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study (PAROS), to provide a basis for future comparative studies across systems of care. Methods: In the first phase, a systematic literature review of EMS system within the eight PAROS countries/regions of interest was conducted. In the second phase, PAROS site directors were surveyed for additional information about the demographics and characteristics of EMS services at their sites. Results: The database and bibliography search identified 25 eligible articles. The survey of EMS systems was completed by seven PAROS directors. By combining information sources from phases 1 and 2, we found that all PAROS EMS systems were single-tiered, and most were public (vs private) and fire-based (Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan, Korea). Ambulance personnel were primarily emergency medical technicians and paramedics, except for Thailand and Turkey, whose personnel include nurses and physicians. Personnel were trained to use automated external defibrillators and have basic cardiac life support certification. The service capability of each EMS system in terms of dispatch, airway management and medications, for example, varied greatly. Conclusion: We found variation in the EMS systems across the eight Asia-Pacific countries/regions studied. The findings will inform the construction of a multinational Asia-Pacific research network for future comparative studies and could serve as a model for international research networks.

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