Comparison of group vs self-directed music interventions to reduce chemotherapy-related distress and cognitive appraisal: an exploratory study

Shu Chuan Chen, Cheng Chen Chou, Hsiu Ju Chang, Mei-Feng Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine effects of group music intervention and self-directed music intervention on anxiety, depression, and cognitive appraisal among women with breast cancer. Methods: A quasi-experimental design randomly assigned 60 women undergoing chemotherapy to 3 groups: group music intervention, self-directed music intervention, or a control group. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale were administered before, after the 8-week interventions, and at 3-month follow-up. Results: Of the 52 women completing the study, results indicated that group music intervention had a significant (p < .01) immediate effect to decrease helplessness/hopelessness and anxious preoccupation and significant effects for reducing anxiety, depression, helplessness/hopelessness, and cognitive avoidance compared to the other two groups at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions: Group music intervention can be considered an effective supportive care in alleviating the chemotherapy-related distress and enhancing cognition modification of women with breast cancer. Further research is needed to determine the role of cognitive appraisal in the illness trajectory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-469
Number of pages9
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Feb 1

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Music
Drug Therapy
Anxiety
Depression
Breast Neoplasms
Social Adjustment
Cognition
Research Design
Control Groups
Research
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

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abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine effects of group music intervention and self-directed music intervention on anxiety, depression, and cognitive appraisal among women with breast cancer. Methods: A quasi-experimental design randomly assigned 60 women undergoing chemotherapy to 3 groups: group music intervention, self-directed music intervention, or a control group. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale were administered before, after the 8-week interventions, and at 3-month follow-up. Results: Of the 52 women completing the study, results indicated that group music intervention had a significant (p < .01) immediate effect to decrease helplessness/hopelessness and anxious preoccupation and significant effects for reducing anxiety, depression, helplessness/hopelessness, and cognitive avoidance compared to the other two groups at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions: Group music intervention can be considered an effective supportive care in alleviating the chemotherapy-related distress and enhancing cognition modification of women with breast cancer. Further research is needed to determine the role of cognitive appraisal in the illness trajectory.",
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Comparison of group vs self-directed music interventions to reduce chemotherapy-related distress and cognitive appraisal : an exploratory study. / Chen, Shu Chuan; Chou, Cheng Chen; Chang, Hsiu Ju; Lin, Mei-Feng.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 461-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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