Comprehensive assessment of HER2 alteration in a colorectal cancer cohort: From next-generation sequencing to clinical significance

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Abstract

Purpose: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is an emerging therapeutic target in colorectal cancer (CRC). Currently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have been used to determine HER2-positive CRCs; however, the clinical utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based techniques for determining HER2 status in CRC has been limited. Here, we detail our experience regarding the assessment of HER2 alterations in a CRC cohort. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled 73 CRC patients who underwent surgery and received adjuvant oxaliplatin treatment. We then examined HER2 alterations using the Oncomine Comprehensive Assay version 1, as well as clinical outcomes, in this cohort. Results: Using the NGS-based assay, HER2 copy number gains in 12 of 73 CRCs were determined to range from 2.74 to 92.62. Of these 12 tumors, 6 had HER2 high-level copy number gain (92.6, 57.9, 57.0, 52.0, 35.2, and 8.42) and were all defined as HER2-positive CRC using HERACLES Diagnostic Criteria. Nevertheless, other 6 patients with low-level copy number gain (ranging from 2.74 to 3.04) and the remaining 61 patients without increase in HER2 copy number were all HER2-negative. Among the 6 HER2-positive CRCs, KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were detected in 1 (17%; G13D) and 2 (33.3%; 1 Q546R and 1 H1047R) patients, respectively. Moreover, 2 of the 6 (33.3%) HER2-positive patients had recurrent disease, while one patient had a partial response after anti-HER2 therapy. Conclusion: NGS-based tools could assist in the simultaneous detection of HER2 and other genomic alterations in patients with CRC. Only CRCs with HER2 high-level copy number gain were HER2-postive by current diagnostic criteria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7867-7875
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Management and Research
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Colorectal Neoplasms
oxaliplatin
human ERBB2 protein
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Therapeutics
Immunohistochemistry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

@article{a6fe5aa007a446a2878fefd4b14416ce,
title = "Comprehensive assessment of HER2 alteration in a colorectal cancer cohort: From next-generation sequencing to clinical significance",
abstract = "Purpose: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is an emerging therapeutic target in colorectal cancer (CRC). Currently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have been used to determine HER2-positive CRCs; however, the clinical utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based techniques for determining HER2 status in CRC has been limited. Here, we detail our experience regarding the assessment of HER2 alterations in a CRC cohort. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled 73 CRC patients who underwent surgery and received adjuvant oxaliplatin treatment. We then examined HER2 alterations using the Oncomine Comprehensive Assay version 1, as well as clinical outcomes, in this cohort. Results: Using the NGS-based assay, HER2 copy number gains in 12 of 73 CRCs were determined to range from 2.74 to 92.62. Of these 12 tumors, 6 had HER2 high-level copy number gain (92.6, 57.9, 57.0, 52.0, 35.2, and 8.42) and were all defined as HER2-positive CRC using HERACLES Diagnostic Criteria. Nevertheless, other 6 patients with low-level copy number gain (ranging from 2.74 to 3.04) and the remaining 61 patients without increase in HER2 copy number were all HER2-negative. Among the 6 HER2-positive CRCs, KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were detected in 1 (17{\%}; G13D) and 2 (33.3{\%}; 1 Q546R and 1 H1047R) patients, respectively. Moreover, 2 of the 6 (33.3{\%}) HER2-positive patients had recurrent disease, while one patient had a partial response after anti-HER2 therapy. Conclusion: NGS-based tools could assist in the simultaneous detection of HER2 and other genomic alterations in patients with CRC. Only CRCs with HER2 high-level copy number gain were HER2-postive by current diagnostic criteria.",
author = "Yeh, {Yu Min} and Lee, {Chun Hui} and Chen, {Shang Hung} and Lee, {Chung Ta} and Lin, {Bo Wen} and Lin, {Shao Chieh} and Chan, {Ren Hao} and Lee, {Jenq Chang} and Shen, {Meng Ru} and Lin, {Peng Chan}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2147/CMAR.S213247",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "7867--7875",
journal = "Cancer Management and Research",
issn = "1179-1322",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comprehensive assessment of HER2 alteration in a colorectal cancer cohort

T2 - From next-generation sequencing to clinical significance

AU - Yeh, Yu Min

AU - Lee, Chun Hui

AU - Chen, Shang Hung

AU - Lee, Chung Ta

AU - Lin, Bo Wen

AU - Lin, Shao Chieh

AU - Chan, Ren Hao

AU - Lee, Jenq Chang

AU - Shen, Meng Ru

AU - Lin, Peng Chan

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is an emerging therapeutic target in colorectal cancer (CRC). Currently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have been used to determine HER2-positive CRCs; however, the clinical utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based techniques for determining HER2 status in CRC has been limited. Here, we detail our experience regarding the assessment of HER2 alterations in a CRC cohort. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled 73 CRC patients who underwent surgery and received adjuvant oxaliplatin treatment. We then examined HER2 alterations using the Oncomine Comprehensive Assay version 1, as well as clinical outcomes, in this cohort. Results: Using the NGS-based assay, HER2 copy number gains in 12 of 73 CRCs were determined to range from 2.74 to 92.62. Of these 12 tumors, 6 had HER2 high-level copy number gain (92.6, 57.9, 57.0, 52.0, 35.2, and 8.42) and were all defined as HER2-positive CRC using HERACLES Diagnostic Criteria. Nevertheless, other 6 patients with low-level copy number gain (ranging from 2.74 to 3.04) and the remaining 61 patients without increase in HER2 copy number were all HER2-negative. Among the 6 HER2-positive CRCs, KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were detected in 1 (17%; G13D) and 2 (33.3%; 1 Q546R and 1 H1047R) patients, respectively. Moreover, 2 of the 6 (33.3%) HER2-positive patients had recurrent disease, while one patient had a partial response after anti-HER2 therapy. Conclusion: NGS-based tools could assist in the simultaneous detection of HER2 and other genomic alterations in patients with CRC. Only CRCs with HER2 high-level copy number gain were HER2-postive by current diagnostic criteria.

AB - Purpose: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is an emerging therapeutic target in colorectal cancer (CRC). Currently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have been used to determine HER2-positive CRCs; however, the clinical utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based techniques for determining HER2 status in CRC has been limited. Here, we detail our experience regarding the assessment of HER2 alterations in a CRC cohort. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled 73 CRC patients who underwent surgery and received adjuvant oxaliplatin treatment. We then examined HER2 alterations using the Oncomine Comprehensive Assay version 1, as well as clinical outcomes, in this cohort. Results: Using the NGS-based assay, HER2 copy number gains in 12 of 73 CRCs were determined to range from 2.74 to 92.62. Of these 12 tumors, 6 had HER2 high-level copy number gain (92.6, 57.9, 57.0, 52.0, 35.2, and 8.42) and were all defined as HER2-positive CRC using HERACLES Diagnostic Criteria. Nevertheless, other 6 patients with low-level copy number gain (ranging from 2.74 to 3.04) and the remaining 61 patients without increase in HER2 copy number were all HER2-negative. Among the 6 HER2-positive CRCs, KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were detected in 1 (17%; G13D) and 2 (33.3%; 1 Q546R and 1 H1047R) patients, respectively. Moreover, 2 of the 6 (33.3%) HER2-positive patients had recurrent disease, while one patient had a partial response after anti-HER2 therapy. Conclusion: NGS-based tools could assist in the simultaneous detection of HER2 and other genomic alterations in patients with CRC. Only CRCs with HER2 high-level copy number gain were HER2-postive by current diagnostic criteria.

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