Correlation between fine motor activity and striatal dopamine D2 receptor density in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls

Yen Kuang Yang, Nan Tsing Chiu, Chwen Cheng Chen, Mitchell Chen, Tzung Lieh Yeh, I. Hui Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Striatal dopamine D2 receptor density is an important indicator of many neuropsychiatric disorders and also of motor activity. This study examined the relationship between a fine motor task (finger tapping test, FTT) and striatal D2 dopamine receptor density by examining 20 healthy volunteers and 20 schizophrenic patients. Striatal D2 receptor density was determined with single photon emission computed tomography using [123I]IBZM (iodo-benzamide). The correlation between the FTT score and striatal D2 receptor density was statistically significant not only in the patient group but also in healthy controls. The FTT scores and striatal D2 receptor density were lower in medicated patients than that in healthy controls. Compared with the Simpson-Angus Scale scores, the FTT scores were more strongly associated with striatal D2 receptor density. The use of neuroleptic medication seemed to influence the associations between FTT scores and striatal D2 receptor density in the patient group. The FTT scores and striatal D2 receptor density were age-sensitive in healthy controls. FTT may be a more sensitive tool for detecting neuroleptic-induced motor impairment in patients with schizophrenia. The sensitivity of the FTT to age and neuroleptic effects may be explained in part by a decline in dopamine D2 density.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-197
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
Volume123
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jul 30

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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