Determinants of daytime sleepiness in first-year nursing students: A questionnaire survey

Ching Feng Huang, Li Yu Yang, Li Min Wu, Yi Liu, Hsing-Mei Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Daytime sleepiness may affect student learning achievement. Research studies have found that daytime sleepiness is common in university students; however, information regarding the determinants of daytime sleepiness in this population is still lacking. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the determinants of daytime sleepiness in first-year nursing students. In particular, we looked for the relationship between perceived symptoms, nocturnal sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness. Design: A cross-sectional and correlational design was employed. Participants and Method: Participants were recruited from two nursing programs at an institute of technology located in southern Taiwan. Ninety-three nursing students completed the questionnaires one month after enrollment into their program. Results: Approximately 35% of the participants experienced excessive daytime sleepiness at the beginning of the semester. Six variables (joining a student club, perceived symptoms, daytime dysfunction, sleep disturbances, sleep latency, and subjective sleep quality) were significantly correlated with daytime sleepiness. Among them, daytime dysfunction and perceived symptoms were two major determinants of daytime sleepiness, both accounting for 37.2% of the variance. Conclusions: Daytime sleepiness in students should not be ignored. It is necessary to help first-year students identify and mitigate physical and psychological symptoms early on, as well as improve daytime functioning, to maintain their daytime performance and promote learning achievement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1048-1053
Number of pages6
JournalNurse Education Today
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Nursing Students
nursing
determinants
Students
sleep
Sleep
questionnaire
student
Learning
Taiwan
institute of technology
first-year student
club
Nursing
learning
semester
Surveys and Questionnaires
Psychology
Technology
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Huang, Ching Feng ; Yang, Li Yu ; Wu, Li Min ; Liu, Yi ; Chen, Hsing-Mei. / Determinants of daytime sleepiness in first-year nursing students : A questionnaire survey. In: Nurse Education Today. 2014 ; Vol. 34, No. 6. pp. 1048-1053.
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abstract = "Background: Daytime sleepiness may affect student learning achievement. Research studies have found that daytime sleepiness is common in university students; however, information regarding the determinants of daytime sleepiness in this population is still lacking. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the determinants of daytime sleepiness in first-year nursing students. In particular, we looked for the relationship between perceived symptoms, nocturnal sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness. Design: A cross-sectional and correlational design was employed. Participants and Method: Participants were recruited from two nursing programs at an institute of technology located in southern Taiwan. Ninety-three nursing students completed the questionnaires one month after enrollment into their program. Results: Approximately 35{\%} of the participants experienced excessive daytime sleepiness at the beginning of the semester. Six variables (joining a student club, perceived symptoms, daytime dysfunction, sleep disturbances, sleep latency, and subjective sleep quality) were significantly correlated with daytime sleepiness. Among them, daytime dysfunction and perceived symptoms were two major determinants of daytime sleepiness, both accounting for 37.2{\%} of the variance. Conclusions: Daytime sleepiness in students should not be ignored. It is necessary to help first-year students identify and mitigate physical and psychological symptoms early on, as well as improve daytime functioning, to maintain their daytime performance and promote learning achievement.",
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Determinants of daytime sleepiness in first-year nursing students : A questionnaire survey. / Huang, Ching Feng; Yang, Li Yu; Wu, Li Min; Liu, Yi; Chen, Hsing-Mei.

In: Nurse Education Today, Vol. 34, No. 6, 01.01.2014, p. 1048-1053.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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