Diagnostic value of segmental longitudinal strain by automated function imaging in coronary artery disease without left ventricular dysfunction

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Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of segmental longitudinal strain for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) assessed by automated function imaging. Methods: One hundred fifty-two subjects (mean age, 63 ± 12 years; 77 men) referred for assessment of cardiac function under suspicion of CAD were recruited for this study. Patients with left ventricular dysfunction or with acute coronary syndromes were excluded. Results: Peak systolic global longitudinal strain (GLS) was significantly decreased in patients with CAD. Peak segmental longitudinal strain difference (LSD) and its ratio to peak systolic GLS were significant higher in patients with CAD. The areas under receiver operating characteristic curves for the diagnosis of CAD were 0.813 for peak systolic GLS, 0.851 for the number of abnormal segments, 0.805 for peak segmental LSD, and 0.862 for the ratio of peak segmental LSD to peak systolic GLS. Using 1.0 as a cutoff point for the ratio of peak segmental LSD to peak systolic GLS, sensitivity was 77.3% and specificity 79.2%. Conclusions: This study suggests that it may be possible to assess CAD with strain by automated function imaging, but further larger scale studies are needed to confirm this.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1183-1189
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Nov 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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