Direct and highly productive conversion of cyanobacteria Arthrospira platensis to ethanol with CaCl2 addition

Shimpei Aikawa, Kentaro Inokuma, Satoshi Wakai, Kengo Sasaki, Chiaki Ogino, Jo Shu Chang, Tomohisa Hasunuma, Akihiko Kondo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis shows promise as a carbohydrate feedstock for biofuel production. The glycogen accumulated in A. platensis can be extracted by lysozyme-degrading the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell walls. The extracted glycogen can be converted to ethanol through hydrolysis by amylolytic enzymes and fermentation by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus, in the presence of lysozyme, a recombinant yeast expressing α-amylase and glucoamylase can convert A. platensis directly to ethanol, which would simplify the procedure for ethanol production. However, the ethanol titer and productivity in this process are lower than in ethanol production from cyanobacteria and green algae in previous reports. Results: To increase the ethanol titer, a high concentration of A. platensis biomass was employed as the carbon source for the ethanol production using a recombinant amylase-expressing yeast. The addition of lysozyme to the fermentation medium increased the ethanol titer, but not the ethanol productivity. The addition of CaCl2 increased both the ethanol titer and productivity by causing the delamination of polysaccharide layer on the cell surface of A. platensis. In the presence of lysozyme and CaCl2, ethanol titer, yield, and productivity improved to 48 g L-1, 93% of theoretical yield, and 1.0 g L-1 h-1 from A. platensis, corresponding to 90 g L-1 of glycogen. Conclusions: We developed an ethanol conversion process using a recombinant amylase-expressing yeast from A. platensis with a high titer, yield, and productivity by adding both lysozyme and CaCl2. The direct and highly productive conversion process from A. platensis via yeast fermentation could be applied to multiple industrial bulk chemicals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number50
JournalBiotechnology for Biofuels
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Feb 27

Fingerprint

Spirulina
Cyanobacteria
cyanobacterium
ethanol
Ethanol
Yeast
Muramidase
Enzymes
yeast
Yeasts
Productivity
Amylases
productivity
Glycogen
Fermentation
fermentation
Glucan 1,4-alpha-Glucosidase
Chlorophyta
Biofuels
Peptidoglycan

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Energy(all)
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Aikawa, Shimpei ; Inokuma, Kentaro ; Wakai, Satoshi ; Sasaki, Kengo ; Ogino, Chiaki ; Chang, Jo Shu ; Hasunuma, Tomohisa ; Kondo, Akihiko. / Direct and highly productive conversion of cyanobacteria Arthrospira platensis to ethanol with CaCl2 addition. In: Biotechnology for Biofuels. 2018 ; Vol. 11, No. 1.
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title = "Direct and highly productive conversion of cyanobacteria Arthrospira platensis to ethanol with CaCl2 addition",
abstract = "Background: The cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis shows promise as a carbohydrate feedstock for biofuel production. The glycogen accumulated in A. platensis can be extracted by lysozyme-degrading the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell walls. The extracted glycogen can be converted to ethanol through hydrolysis by amylolytic enzymes and fermentation by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus, in the presence of lysozyme, a recombinant yeast expressing α-amylase and glucoamylase can convert A. platensis directly to ethanol, which would simplify the procedure for ethanol production. However, the ethanol titer and productivity in this process are lower than in ethanol production from cyanobacteria and green algae in previous reports. Results: To increase the ethanol titer, a high concentration of A. platensis biomass was employed as the carbon source for the ethanol production using a recombinant amylase-expressing yeast. The addition of lysozyme to the fermentation medium increased the ethanol titer, but not the ethanol productivity. The addition of CaCl2 increased both the ethanol titer and productivity by causing the delamination of polysaccharide layer on the cell surface of A. platensis. In the presence of lysozyme and CaCl2, ethanol titer, yield, and productivity improved to 48 g L-1, 93{\%} of theoretical yield, and 1.0 g L-1 h-1 from A. platensis, corresponding to 90 g L-1 of glycogen. Conclusions: We developed an ethanol conversion process using a recombinant amylase-expressing yeast from A. platensis with a high titer, yield, and productivity by adding both lysozyme and CaCl2. The direct and highly productive conversion process from A. platensis via yeast fermentation could be applied to multiple industrial bulk chemicals.",
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Direct and highly productive conversion of cyanobacteria Arthrospira platensis to ethanol with CaCl2 addition. / Aikawa, Shimpei; Inokuma, Kentaro; Wakai, Satoshi; Sasaki, Kengo; Ogino, Chiaki; Chang, Jo Shu; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko.

In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, Vol. 11, No. 1, 50, 27.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Direct and highly productive conversion of cyanobacteria Arthrospira platensis to ethanol with CaCl2 addition

AU - Aikawa, Shimpei

AU - Inokuma, Kentaro

AU - Wakai, Satoshi

AU - Sasaki, Kengo

AU - Ogino, Chiaki

AU - Chang, Jo Shu

AU - Hasunuma, Tomohisa

AU - Kondo, Akihiko

PY - 2018/2/27

Y1 - 2018/2/27

N2 - Background: The cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis shows promise as a carbohydrate feedstock for biofuel production. The glycogen accumulated in A. platensis can be extracted by lysozyme-degrading the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell walls. The extracted glycogen can be converted to ethanol through hydrolysis by amylolytic enzymes and fermentation by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus, in the presence of lysozyme, a recombinant yeast expressing α-amylase and glucoamylase can convert A. platensis directly to ethanol, which would simplify the procedure for ethanol production. However, the ethanol titer and productivity in this process are lower than in ethanol production from cyanobacteria and green algae in previous reports. Results: To increase the ethanol titer, a high concentration of A. platensis biomass was employed as the carbon source for the ethanol production using a recombinant amylase-expressing yeast. The addition of lysozyme to the fermentation medium increased the ethanol titer, but not the ethanol productivity. The addition of CaCl2 increased both the ethanol titer and productivity by causing the delamination of polysaccharide layer on the cell surface of A. platensis. In the presence of lysozyme and CaCl2, ethanol titer, yield, and productivity improved to 48 g L-1, 93% of theoretical yield, and 1.0 g L-1 h-1 from A. platensis, corresponding to 90 g L-1 of glycogen. Conclusions: We developed an ethanol conversion process using a recombinant amylase-expressing yeast from A. platensis with a high titer, yield, and productivity by adding both lysozyme and CaCl2. The direct and highly productive conversion process from A. platensis via yeast fermentation could be applied to multiple industrial bulk chemicals.

AB - Background: The cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis shows promise as a carbohydrate feedstock for biofuel production. The glycogen accumulated in A. platensis can be extracted by lysozyme-degrading the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell walls. The extracted glycogen can be converted to ethanol through hydrolysis by amylolytic enzymes and fermentation by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus, in the presence of lysozyme, a recombinant yeast expressing α-amylase and glucoamylase can convert A. platensis directly to ethanol, which would simplify the procedure for ethanol production. However, the ethanol titer and productivity in this process are lower than in ethanol production from cyanobacteria and green algae in previous reports. Results: To increase the ethanol titer, a high concentration of A. platensis biomass was employed as the carbon source for the ethanol production using a recombinant amylase-expressing yeast. The addition of lysozyme to the fermentation medium increased the ethanol titer, but not the ethanol productivity. The addition of CaCl2 increased both the ethanol titer and productivity by causing the delamination of polysaccharide layer on the cell surface of A. platensis. In the presence of lysozyme and CaCl2, ethanol titer, yield, and productivity improved to 48 g L-1, 93% of theoretical yield, and 1.0 g L-1 h-1 from A. platensis, corresponding to 90 g L-1 of glycogen. Conclusions: We developed an ethanol conversion process using a recombinant amylase-expressing yeast from A. platensis with a high titer, yield, and productivity by adding both lysozyme and CaCl2. The direct and highly productive conversion process from A. platensis via yeast fermentation could be applied to multiple industrial bulk chemicals.

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U2 - 10.1186/s13068-018-1050-y

DO - 10.1186/s13068-018-1050-y

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