Do stress and long-term potentiation share the same molecular mechanisms?

Chiung Chun Huang, Chih Hao Yang, Kuei-Sen Hsu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stress is a biological, significant factor shown to influence hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive functions. Although numerous studies have reported that stress produces a suppression in long-term potentiation (LTP; a putative synaptic mechanism underlying learning and memory), little is known about the mechanism by which this occurs. Because the effects of stress on LTP and its converse process, long-term depression (LTD), parallel the changes in synaptic plasticity that occur following the establishment of LTP with tetanic stimulation (i.e., occluding LTP and enhancing LTD induction), it has been proposed that stress affects subsequent hippocampal plasticity by sharing the same molecular machinery required to support LTP This article summarizes recent findings from ours and other laboratories to assess this view and discusses relevant hypotheses in the study of stress-related modifications of synaptic plasticity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-235
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular Neurobiology
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1

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Neuronal Plasticity
Long-Term Potentiation
Depression
Biological Factors
Cognition
Learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Huang, Chiung Chun ; Yang, Chih Hao ; Hsu, Kuei-Sen. / Do stress and long-term potentiation share the same molecular mechanisms?. In: Molecular Neurobiology. 2005 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 223-235.
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Do stress and long-term potentiation share the same molecular mechanisms? / Huang, Chiung Chun; Yang, Chih Hao; Hsu, Kuei-Sen.

In: Molecular Neurobiology, Vol. 32, No. 3, 01.01.2005, p. 223-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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