Does ei matter? Exploring the association between physician emotional intelligence and patient-physician relationships

Hui-Ching Weng, Hung Chi Chen, Han Jung Chen, Ben Chi Yuan

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Emotional intelligence is increasingly recognized as important in nurturing the patient-physician relationship in medical education; however, current studies have found limited evidence for an association between a physicianj|s emotional intelligence and the patient-physician relationship. The study explored the associations among a physician]]s emotional intelligence, patient trust, and the patient-physician by using tri-angular and multi-level approaches. Nine hundred and ninety-four outpatients and 39 physicians representing 11 specialties were surveyed. Results indicated these was no significant association between the patientjjs rating of trust and the physician jjs self-rated emotional intelligence, but there was a significant association between the patientjjs rating of trust and the physicianj|s emotional intelligence as rated by the nursing director (r = -.301, p <.001) and senior staff (r = -.301, p < .001). Results of structural equation analysis indicated that composite emotional intelligence of physicians (r=.93, p < 0.01), ratio of outpatient number in the specialty (r=.19, p < 0.10), and ratio of follow-up patients ((r=. 56, p <.0.05), had positive effects on patient trust. Patient trust had a positive impact on the patient-physician relationships (/O = .65, p <. 0.01), which modulated the effect of trust on patient satisfaction (/O = .95, p <.001). The final model proved to be valid (chi square/df = 26.46/28, p =0.55), showing a sound fit (GFI = 0.91 and RMSEA = 0.001). The model explained 37% of the variance of trust, 48% of patient-physician relationships and 56% satisfaction. Multiple sources for assessment of physician emotional intelligence may be more objective and predictive than physician self-ratings in ascertaining the associations among patient trust, patient-physician relationships, and patient satisfaction, emotional intelligence coaching for physicians and an interdisplinary collaboration among clinicians are needed to optimize the efficient and therapeutic function of the patient-physician relationships for patients.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Dec 1
Event67th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2007 - Philadelphia, PA, United States
Duration: 2007 Aug 32007 Aug 8

Other

Other67th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2007
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia, PA
Period07-08-0307-08-08

Fingerprint

Medical education
Nursing
Acoustic waves
Composite materials
Physician-patient relationship
Emotional intelligence
Physicians
Rating

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Management Information Systems
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Weng, H-C., Chen, H. C., Chen, H. J., & Yuan, B. C. (2007). Does ei matter? Exploring the association between physician emotional intelligence and patient-physician relationships. Paper presented at 67th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2007, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
Weng, Hui-Ching ; Chen, Hung Chi ; Chen, Han Jung ; Yuan, Ben Chi. / Does ei matter? Exploring the association between physician emotional intelligence and patient-physician relationships. Paper presented at 67th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2007, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
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Weng, H-C, Chen, HC, Chen, HJ & Yuan, BC 2007, 'Does ei matter? Exploring the association between physician emotional intelligence and patient-physician relationships' Paper presented at 67th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2007, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 07-08-03 - 07-08-08, .

Does ei matter? Exploring the association between physician emotional intelligence and patient-physician relationships. / Weng, Hui-Ching; Chen, Hung Chi; Chen, Han Jung; Yuan, Ben Chi.

2007. Paper presented at 67th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2007, Philadelphia, PA, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Weng H-C, Chen HC, Chen HJ, Yuan BC. Does ei matter? Exploring the association between physician emotional intelligence and patient-physician relationships. 2007. Paper presented at 67th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2007, Philadelphia, PA, United States.