Drowning mortality by intent: A population-based cross-sectional study of 32 OECD countries, 2012-2014

Wan Hua Hsieh, Chien Hsing Wang, Tsung Hsueh Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To compare the drowning mortality rates and proportion of deaths of each intent among all drowning deaths in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries in 2012-2014. Design A population-based cross-sectional study. Setting 32 OECD countries. Participants Individuals in OECD countries who died from drowning. Main outcome measures Drowning mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 population) and proportion (%) of deaths of each intent (ie, unintentional intent, intentional self-harm, assault, undetermined intent and all intents combined) among all drowning deaths. Results Countries with the highest drowning mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 population) were Estonia (3.53), Japan (3.49) and Greece (2.40) for unintentional intent; Ireland (0.96), Belgium (0.96) and Korea (0.89) for intentional self-harm; Austria (0.57), Korea (0.56) and Hungary (0.44) for undetermined intent and Japan (4.35), Estonia (3.70) and Korea (2.73) for all intents combined. Korea ranked 12th and 3rd for unintentional intent and all intents combined, respectively. By contrast, Belgium ranked 2nd and 15th for intentional self-harm and all intents combined, respectively. The proportion of deaths of each intent among all drowning deaths in each country varied greatly: from 26.2% in Belgium to 96.8% in Chile for unintentional intent; 0.7% in Mexico to 57.4% in Belgium for intentional self-harm; 0.0% in nine countries to 4.9% in Mexico for assault and 0.0% in Israel and Turkey to 38.3% in Austria for undetermined intent. Conclusions A large variation in the practice of classifying undetermined intent in drowning deaths across countries was noted and this variation hinders valid international comparisons of intent-specific (unintentional and intentional self-harm) drowning mortality rates.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere021501
JournalBMJ open
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jul 1

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Cross-Sectional Studies
Mortality
Belgium
Korea
Population
Estonia
Austria
Mexico
Japan
Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development
Hungary
Chile
Greece
Israel
Turkey
Ireland
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{c344efd3abf244478ecc3d07b38ce66c,
title = "Drowning mortality by intent: A population-based cross-sectional study of 32 OECD countries, 2012-2014",
abstract = "Objective To compare the drowning mortality rates and proportion of deaths of each intent among all drowning deaths in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries in 2012-2014. Design A population-based cross-sectional study. Setting 32 OECD countries. Participants Individuals in OECD countries who died from drowning. Main outcome measures Drowning mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 population) and proportion ({\%}) of deaths of each intent (ie, unintentional intent, intentional self-harm, assault, undetermined intent and all intents combined) among all drowning deaths. Results Countries with the highest drowning mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 population) were Estonia (3.53), Japan (3.49) and Greece (2.40) for unintentional intent; Ireland (0.96), Belgium (0.96) and Korea (0.89) for intentional self-harm; Austria (0.57), Korea (0.56) and Hungary (0.44) for undetermined intent and Japan (4.35), Estonia (3.70) and Korea (2.73) for all intents combined. Korea ranked 12th and 3rd for unintentional intent and all intents combined, respectively. By contrast, Belgium ranked 2nd and 15th for intentional self-harm and all intents combined, respectively. The proportion of deaths of each intent among all drowning deaths in each country varied greatly: from 26.2{\%} in Belgium to 96.8{\%} in Chile for unintentional intent; 0.7{\%} in Mexico to 57.4{\%} in Belgium for intentional self-harm; 0.0{\%} in nine countries to 4.9{\%} in Mexico for assault and 0.0{\%} in Israel and Turkey to 38.3{\%} in Austria for undetermined intent. Conclusions A large variation in the practice of classifying undetermined intent in drowning deaths across countries was noted and this variation hinders valid international comparisons of intent-specific (unintentional and intentional self-harm) drowning mortality rates.",
author = "Hsieh, {Wan Hua} and Wang, {Chien Hsing} and Lu, {Tsung Hsueh}",
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Drowning mortality by intent : A population-based cross-sectional study of 32 OECD countries, 2012-2014. / Hsieh, Wan Hua; Wang, Chien Hsing; Lu, Tsung Hsueh.

In: BMJ open, Vol. 8, No. 7, e021501, 01.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Drowning mortality by intent

T2 - A population-based cross-sectional study of 32 OECD countries, 2012-2014

AU - Hsieh, Wan Hua

AU - Wang, Chien Hsing

AU - Lu, Tsung Hsueh

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N2 - Objective To compare the drowning mortality rates and proportion of deaths of each intent among all drowning deaths in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries in 2012-2014. Design A population-based cross-sectional study. Setting 32 OECD countries. Participants Individuals in OECD countries who died from drowning. Main outcome measures Drowning mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 population) and proportion (%) of deaths of each intent (ie, unintentional intent, intentional self-harm, assault, undetermined intent and all intents combined) among all drowning deaths. Results Countries with the highest drowning mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 population) were Estonia (3.53), Japan (3.49) and Greece (2.40) for unintentional intent; Ireland (0.96), Belgium (0.96) and Korea (0.89) for intentional self-harm; Austria (0.57), Korea (0.56) and Hungary (0.44) for undetermined intent and Japan (4.35), Estonia (3.70) and Korea (2.73) for all intents combined. Korea ranked 12th and 3rd for unintentional intent and all intents combined, respectively. By contrast, Belgium ranked 2nd and 15th for intentional self-harm and all intents combined, respectively. The proportion of deaths of each intent among all drowning deaths in each country varied greatly: from 26.2% in Belgium to 96.8% in Chile for unintentional intent; 0.7% in Mexico to 57.4% in Belgium for intentional self-harm; 0.0% in nine countries to 4.9% in Mexico for assault and 0.0% in Israel and Turkey to 38.3% in Austria for undetermined intent. Conclusions A large variation in the practice of classifying undetermined intent in drowning deaths across countries was noted and this variation hinders valid international comparisons of intent-specific (unintentional and intentional self-harm) drowning mortality rates.

AB - Objective To compare the drowning mortality rates and proportion of deaths of each intent among all drowning deaths in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries in 2012-2014. Design A population-based cross-sectional study. Setting 32 OECD countries. Participants Individuals in OECD countries who died from drowning. Main outcome measures Drowning mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 population) and proportion (%) of deaths of each intent (ie, unintentional intent, intentional self-harm, assault, undetermined intent and all intents combined) among all drowning deaths. Results Countries with the highest drowning mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 population) were Estonia (3.53), Japan (3.49) and Greece (2.40) for unintentional intent; Ireland (0.96), Belgium (0.96) and Korea (0.89) for intentional self-harm; Austria (0.57), Korea (0.56) and Hungary (0.44) for undetermined intent and Japan (4.35), Estonia (3.70) and Korea (2.73) for all intents combined. Korea ranked 12th and 3rd for unintentional intent and all intents combined, respectively. By contrast, Belgium ranked 2nd and 15th for intentional self-harm and all intents combined, respectively. The proportion of deaths of each intent among all drowning deaths in each country varied greatly: from 26.2% in Belgium to 96.8% in Chile for unintentional intent; 0.7% in Mexico to 57.4% in Belgium for intentional self-harm; 0.0% in nine countries to 4.9% in Mexico for assault and 0.0% in Israel and Turkey to 38.3% in Austria for undetermined intent. Conclusions A large variation in the practice of classifying undetermined intent in drowning deaths across countries was noted and this variation hinders valid international comparisons of intent-specific (unintentional and intentional self-harm) drowning mortality rates.

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