Early reperfusion improves the recovery of contralateral electrophysiological diaschisis following focal cerebral ischemia in rats

Yu-Chang Hong, Ya Shuan Chou, Chih-Han Chang, Hsiao Wen Lin, Hung Yi Chen, Tsung Ying Chen, Shih-Huang Tai, E-Jian Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We evaluated electrophysiological benefits of reperfusion following ischemic stroke. Methods: Rats received either transient proximal occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery for 30 (Group I, n=8) or 90 minutes (Group II, n=8) or permanent thermocoagulation of the distal right middle cerebral artery (Group III, n=6). Neurobehavioral outcome and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were examined before and at 7 days after the onset of brain ischemia. Brain infarction was assessed after the rats were euthanized. Results: Before ischemia, stable SSEPs were consistently recorded. At 7 days post-insult, Group III (permanent occlusion) had the greatest reduction in the SSEPs recorded ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Groups I and II (transient ischemic groups) also had depressant SSEPs recorded from the ipsilateral ischemic and the contralateral intact brain (electrophysiological diaschisis). However, prolonged ischemia resulted in greater brain infarction and increased neurological deficits in addition to greater reductions in the ipsilateral and the contralateral SSEPs. Conclusion: Early reperfusion facilitates the electrophysiological recovery in both ipsilateral lesional and the contralateral intact brain, which may be closely relevant to post-injury brain rewiring. We also demonstrated that contralateral electrophysiological diaschisis could be greatly reversed by early reperfusion and is independent of the lesion size of striatum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)828-834
Number of pages7
JournalNeurological Research
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Oct 1

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Somatosensory Evoked Potentials
Brain Ischemia
Reperfusion
Brain Infarction
Ischemia
Electrocoagulation
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Middle Cerebral Artery
Brain
Brain Injuries
Stroke

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Early reperfusion improves the recovery of contralateral electrophysiological diaschisis following focal cerebral ischemia in rats",
abstract = "Objectives: We evaluated electrophysiological benefits of reperfusion following ischemic stroke. Methods: Rats received either transient proximal occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery for 30 (Group I, n=8) or 90 minutes (Group II, n=8) or permanent thermocoagulation of the distal right middle cerebral artery (Group III, n=6). Neurobehavioral outcome and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were examined before and at 7 days after the onset of brain ischemia. Brain infarction was assessed after the rats were euthanized. Results: Before ischemia, stable SSEPs were consistently recorded. At 7 days post-insult, Group III (permanent occlusion) had the greatest reduction in the SSEPs recorded ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Groups I and II (transient ischemic groups) also had depressant SSEPs recorded from the ipsilateral ischemic and the contralateral intact brain (electrophysiological diaschisis). However, prolonged ischemia resulted in greater brain infarction and increased neurological deficits in addition to greater reductions in the ipsilateral and the contralateral SSEPs. Conclusion: Early reperfusion facilitates the electrophysiological recovery in both ipsilateral lesional and the contralateral intact brain, which may be closely relevant to post-injury brain rewiring. We also demonstrated that contralateral electrophysiological diaschisis could be greatly reversed by early reperfusion and is independent of the lesion size of striatum.",
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Early reperfusion improves the recovery of contralateral electrophysiological diaschisis following focal cerebral ischemia in rats. / Hong, Yu-Chang; Chou, Ya Shuan; Chang, Chih-Han; Lin, Hsiao Wen; Chen, Hung Yi; Chen, Tsung Ying; Tai, Shih-Huang; Lee, E-Jian.

In: Neurological Research, Vol. 32, No. 8, 01.10.2010, p. 828-834.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early reperfusion improves the recovery of contralateral electrophysiological diaschisis following focal cerebral ischemia in rats

AU - Hong, Yu-Chang

AU - Chou, Ya Shuan

AU - Chang, Chih-Han

AU - Lin, Hsiao Wen

AU - Chen, Hung Yi

AU - Chen, Tsung Ying

AU - Tai, Shih-Huang

AU - Lee, E-Jian

PY - 2010/10/1

Y1 - 2010/10/1

N2 - Objectives: We evaluated electrophysiological benefits of reperfusion following ischemic stroke. Methods: Rats received either transient proximal occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery for 30 (Group I, n=8) or 90 minutes (Group II, n=8) or permanent thermocoagulation of the distal right middle cerebral artery (Group III, n=6). Neurobehavioral outcome and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were examined before and at 7 days after the onset of brain ischemia. Brain infarction was assessed after the rats were euthanized. Results: Before ischemia, stable SSEPs were consistently recorded. At 7 days post-insult, Group III (permanent occlusion) had the greatest reduction in the SSEPs recorded ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Groups I and II (transient ischemic groups) also had depressant SSEPs recorded from the ipsilateral ischemic and the contralateral intact brain (electrophysiological diaschisis). However, prolonged ischemia resulted in greater brain infarction and increased neurological deficits in addition to greater reductions in the ipsilateral and the contralateral SSEPs. Conclusion: Early reperfusion facilitates the electrophysiological recovery in both ipsilateral lesional and the contralateral intact brain, which may be closely relevant to post-injury brain rewiring. We also demonstrated that contralateral electrophysiological diaschisis could be greatly reversed by early reperfusion and is independent of the lesion size of striatum.

AB - Objectives: We evaluated electrophysiological benefits of reperfusion following ischemic stroke. Methods: Rats received either transient proximal occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery for 30 (Group I, n=8) or 90 minutes (Group II, n=8) or permanent thermocoagulation of the distal right middle cerebral artery (Group III, n=6). Neurobehavioral outcome and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were examined before and at 7 days after the onset of brain ischemia. Brain infarction was assessed after the rats were euthanized. Results: Before ischemia, stable SSEPs were consistently recorded. At 7 days post-insult, Group III (permanent occlusion) had the greatest reduction in the SSEPs recorded ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Groups I and II (transient ischemic groups) also had depressant SSEPs recorded from the ipsilateral ischemic and the contralateral intact brain (electrophysiological diaschisis). However, prolonged ischemia resulted in greater brain infarction and increased neurological deficits in addition to greater reductions in the ipsilateral and the contralateral SSEPs. Conclusion: Early reperfusion facilitates the electrophysiological recovery in both ipsilateral lesional and the contralateral intact brain, which may be closely relevant to post-injury brain rewiring. We also demonstrated that contralateral electrophysiological diaschisis could be greatly reversed by early reperfusion and is independent of the lesion size of striatum.

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