Early surgical correction for isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury

Yau-Lin Tseng, Ming Ho Wu, Mu Yen Lin, Wu-Wei Lai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and long-term results of early gastric surgery for patients with isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury. Materials and Methods: Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series was routinely performed around the 4th week after acid corrosion injury. Patients with gastric stricture and no risk of delayed esophageal stricture underwent early solitary gastric surgery, which was defined when performance of the procedure took place within 2 months of the injury. Results: From June 1988 to June 2000, 35 of 378 patients with acid corrosion injury developed isolated gastric stricture. Twenty-four (68.6%) lesions were located in the antrum, and 11 (31.4%) in the gastric body. Postprandial vomiting presented earlier for the antral stricture group (17.6 ± 1.1 versus 25.4 ± 3.4 days after injury; p = 0.005). The UGI series was performed from 16 to 41 days after injury (average 25 days). Of the 35 acid corrosion injury patients in this study, 4 were excluded because of late referrals to our institution or the patient's hesitation which resulted in delayed surgery. The remaining 31 patients underwent gastric surgery 35.7 ± 3.2 days after ingestion (34.6 ± 3.6 and 38.1 ± 3.4 days for cases of antral and gastric body stricture, respectively). Surgical procedures consisted of hemigastrectomy (n = 16), antrectomy (n = 2), gastroenterostomy (n = 2), subtotal gastrectomy (n = 6), and total gastrectomy (n = 5). There were 4 cases of postoperative complications (12.9%) including adhesion ileus (n = 2), wound infection (n = 1), and massive, postoperative UGI bleeding (n = 1). Surgical mortality was zero. All patients tolerated oral intake well after surgery. During the minimum follow-up period of 1 year, 1 patient developed esophagojejunostomy stenosis, which was resolved by dilation, and there was 1 case of dumping syndrome, which was treated by diet control. Conclusion: Early surgery correction is feasible and safe if patients with isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury are carefully selected. All patients in our study recovered early, with a low morbidity rate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)276-280
Number of pages5
JournalDigestive Surgery
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Sep 23

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Corrosion
Stomach
Pathologic Constriction
Acids
Wounds and Injuries
Gastrectomy
Dumping Syndrome
Gastroenterostomy
Esophageal Stenosis
Ileus
Wound Infection
Vomiting
Dilatation
Referral and Consultation
Eating
Hemorrhage
Diet
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

@article{f2d3cb5492b349ef8bb6d61db8e50654,
title = "Early surgical correction for isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and long-term results of early gastric surgery for patients with isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury. Materials and Methods: Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series was routinely performed around the 4th week after acid corrosion injury. Patients with gastric stricture and no risk of delayed esophageal stricture underwent early solitary gastric surgery, which was defined when performance of the procedure took place within 2 months of the injury. Results: From June 1988 to June 2000, 35 of 378 patients with acid corrosion injury developed isolated gastric stricture. Twenty-four (68.6{\%}) lesions were located in the antrum, and 11 (31.4{\%}) in the gastric body. Postprandial vomiting presented earlier for the antral stricture group (17.6 ± 1.1 versus 25.4 ± 3.4 days after injury; p = 0.005). The UGI series was performed from 16 to 41 days after injury (average 25 days). Of the 35 acid corrosion injury patients in this study, 4 were excluded because of late referrals to our institution or the patient's hesitation which resulted in delayed surgery. The remaining 31 patients underwent gastric surgery 35.7 ± 3.2 days after ingestion (34.6 ± 3.6 and 38.1 ± 3.4 days for cases of antral and gastric body stricture, respectively). Surgical procedures consisted of hemigastrectomy (n = 16), antrectomy (n = 2), gastroenterostomy (n = 2), subtotal gastrectomy (n = 6), and total gastrectomy (n = 5). There were 4 cases of postoperative complications (12.9{\%}) including adhesion ileus (n = 2), wound infection (n = 1), and massive, postoperative UGI bleeding (n = 1). Surgical mortality was zero. All patients tolerated oral intake well after surgery. During the minimum follow-up period of 1 year, 1 patient developed esophagojejunostomy stenosis, which was resolved by dilation, and there was 1 case of dumping syndrome, which was treated by diet control. Conclusion: Early surgery correction is feasible and safe if patients with isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury are carefully selected. All patients in our study recovered early, with a low morbidity rate.",
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Early surgical correction for isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury. / Tseng, Yau-Lin; Wu, Ming Ho; Lin, Mu Yen; Lai, Wu-Wei.

In: Digestive Surgery, Vol. 19, No. 4, 23.09.2002, p. 276-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and long-term results of early gastric surgery for patients with isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury. Materials and Methods: Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series was routinely performed around the 4th week after acid corrosion injury. Patients with gastric stricture and no risk of delayed esophageal stricture underwent early solitary gastric surgery, which was defined when performance of the procedure took place within 2 months of the injury. Results: From June 1988 to June 2000, 35 of 378 patients with acid corrosion injury developed isolated gastric stricture. Twenty-four (68.6%) lesions were located in the antrum, and 11 (31.4%) in the gastric body. Postprandial vomiting presented earlier for the antral stricture group (17.6 ± 1.1 versus 25.4 ± 3.4 days after injury; p = 0.005). The UGI series was performed from 16 to 41 days after injury (average 25 days). Of the 35 acid corrosion injury patients in this study, 4 were excluded because of late referrals to our institution or the patient's hesitation which resulted in delayed surgery. The remaining 31 patients underwent gastric surgery 35.7 ± 3.2 days after ingestion (34.6 ± 3.6 and 38.1 ± 3.4 days for cases of antral and gastric body stricture, respectively). Surgical procedures consisted of hemigastrectomy (n = 16), antrectomy (n = 2), gastroenterostomy (n = 2), subtotal gastrectomy (n = 6), and total gastrectomy (n = 5). There were 4 cases of postoperative complications (12.9%) including adhesion ileus (n = 2), wound infection (n = 1), and massive, postoperative UGI bleeding (n = 1). Surgical mortality was zero. All patients tolerated oral intake well after surgery. During the minimum follow-up period of 1 year, 1 patient developed esophagojejunostomy stenosis, which was resolved by dilation, and there was 1 case of dumping syndrome, which was treated by diet control. Conclusion: Early surgery correction is feasible and safe if patients with isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury are carefully selected. All patients in our study recovered early, with a low morbidity rate.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and long-term results of early gastric surgery for patients with isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury. Materials and Methods: Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series was routinely performed around the 4th week after acid corrosion injury. Patients with gastric stricture and no risk of delayed esophageal stricture underwent early solitary gastric surgery, which was defined when performance of the procedure took place within 2 months of the injury. Results: From June 1988 to June 2000, 35 of 378 patients with acid corrosion injury developed isolated gastric stricture. Twenty-four (68.6%) lesions were located in the antrum, and 11 (31.4%) in the gastric body. Postprandial vomiting presented earlier for the antral stricture group (17.6 ± 1.1 versus 25.4 ± 3.4 days after injury; p = 0.005). The UGI series was performed from 16 to 41 days after injury (average 25 days). Of the 35 acid corrosion injury patients in this study, 4 were excluded because of late referrals to our institution or the patient's hesitation which resulted in delayed surgery. The remaining 31 patients underwent gastric surgery 35.7 ± 3.2 days after ingestion (34.6 ± 3.6 and 38.1 ± 3.4 days for cases of antral and gastric body stricture, respectively). Surgical procedures consisted of hemigastrectomy (n = 16), antrectomy (n = 2), gastroenterostomy (n = 2), subtotal gastrectomy (n = 6), and total gastrectomy (n = 5). There were 4 cases of postoperative complications (12.9%) including adhesion ileus (n = 2), wound infection (n = 1), and massive, postoperative UGI bleeding (n = 1). Surgical mortality was zero. All patients tolerated oral intake well after surgery. During the minimum follow-up period of 1 year, 1 patient developed esophagojejunostomy stenosis, which was resolved by dilation, and there was 1 case of dumping syndrome, which was treated by diet control. Conclusion: Early surgery correction is feasible and safe if patients with isolated gastric stricture following acid corrosion injury are carefully selected. All patients in our study recovered early, with a low morbidity rate.

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