Effects of a Web-Based Antenatal Care System on Maternal Stress and Self-Efficacy During Pregnancy

A Study in Taiwan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Women may experience significant stress during pregnancy, and antenatal care and education provide a means to address this. E-health, the use of computer and information technology for health care, has been incorporated into antenatal care and education, but e-health has not been evaluated for its usefulness in addressing stress. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a web-based antenatal care and education system on pregnancy-related stress, general self-efficacy, and satisfaction with antenatal care. Methods: A quasi-experimental design enrolled pregnant women at 16 to 24 weeks’ gestation with a low-risk pregnancy. Women in the control group (n = 67) received routine antenatal care; women in the experimental group (n = 68) also received a web-based antenatal care and education program in the second trimester. Pregnancy stress and general self-efficacy were assessed at study entry and again at 36 to 38 weeks’ gestation; satisfaction with care was assessed at the study endpoint. Results: When the pretest scores were controlled, the women in the experimental group reported significantly lower pregnancy-related stress (F = 12.9, P <.001) and significantly higher self-efficacy (F = 17.61, P <.001) than did the women in the control group. Women in the experimental group reported lower pregnancy-related stress (t = 5.09, P <.001) and a higher general self-efficacy (t = −3.17, P =.001) at posttest compared to pretest. However, the women in the control group reported a lower general self-efficacy at posttest compared to pretest (t = 2.86, P =.006). Women in the experimental group reported significantly higher satisfaction levels with antenatal care than those in the control group. Discussion: A web-based antenatal care and education system can improve pregnancy-related stress and general self-efficacy among pregnant women. Integrating health care with web-based or internet-based interventions may improve the quality of antenatal care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-213
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Midwifery and Women's Health
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Mar 1

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Prenatal Care
Self Efficacy
Taiwan
Prenatal Education
Mothers
Pregnancy
Control Groups
Pregnant Women
Medical Informatics
Biomedical Technology
Quality of Health Care
Health
Second Pregnancy Trimester
Internet
Research Design
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

@article{2075c4fd9f9a413ea3cea81268512f48,
title = "Effects of a Web-Based Antenatal Care System on Maternal Stress and Self-Efficacy During Pregnancy: A Study in Taiwan",
abstract = "Introduction: Women may experience significant stress during pregnancy, and antenatal care and education provide a means to address this. E-health, the use of computer and information technology for health care, has been incorporated into antenatal care and education, but e-health has not been evaluated for its usefulness in addressing stress. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a web-based antenatal care and education system on pregnancy-related stress, general self-efficacy, and satisfaction with antenatal care. Methods: A quasi-experimental design enrolled pregnant women at 16 to 24 weeks’ gestation with a low-risk pregnancy. Women in the control group (n = 67) received routine antenatal care; women in the experimental group (n = 68) also received a web-based antenatal care and education program in the second trimester. Pregnancy stress and general self-efficacy were assessed at study entry and again at 36 to 38 weeks’ gestation; satisfaction with care was assessed at the study endpoint. Results: When the pretest scores were controlled, the women in the experimental group reported significantly lower pregnancy-related stress (F = 12.9, P <.001) and significantly higher self-efficacy (F = 17.61, P <.001) than did the women in the control group. Women in the experimental group reported lower pregnancy-related stress (t = 5.09, P <.001) and a higher general self-efficacy (t = −3.17, P =.001) at posttest compared to pretest. However, the women in the control group reported a lower general self-efficacy at posttest compared to pretest (t = 2.86, P =.006). Women in the experimental group reported significantly higher satisfaction levels with antenatal care than those in the control group. Discussion: A web-based antenatal care and education system can improve pregnancy-related stress and general self-efficacy among pregnant women. Integrating health care with web-based or internet-based interventions may improve the quality of antenatal care.",
author = "Tsai, {Yi Jing} and Yu-Yun Hsu and Ting-Wei Hou and Chiung-Hsin Chang",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
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doi = "10.1111/jmwh.12685",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "205--213",
journal = "Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health",
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T1 - Effects of a Web-Based Antenatal Care System on Maternal Stress and Self-Efficacy During Pregnancy

T2 - A Study in Taiwan

AU - Tsai, Yi Jing

AU - Hsu, Yu-Yun

AU - Hou, Ting-Wei

AU - Chang, Chiung-Hsin

PY - 2018/3/1

Y1 - 2018/3/1

N2 - Introduction: Women may experience significant stress during pregnancy, and antenatal care and education provide a means to address this. E-health, the use of computer and information technology for health care, has been incorporated into antenatal care and education, but e-health has not been evaluated for its usefulness in addressing stress. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a web-based antenatal care and education system on pregnancy-related stress, general self-efficacy, and satisfaction with antenatal care. Methods: A quasi-experimental design enrolled pregnant women at 16 to 24 weeks’ gestation with a low-risk pregnancy. Women in the control group (n = 67) received routine antenatal care; women in the experimental group (n = 68) also received a web-based antenatal care and education program in the second trimester. Pregnancy stress and general self-efficacy were assessed at study entry and again at 36 to 38 weeks’ gestation; satisfaction with care was assessed at the study endpoint. Results: When the pretest scores were controlled, the women in the experimental group reported significantly lower pregnancy-related stress (F = 12.9, P <.001) and significantly higher self-efficacy (F = 17.61, P <.001) than did the women in the control group. Women in the experimental group reported lower pregnancy-related stress (t = 5.09, P <.001) and a higher general self-efficacy (t = −3.17, P =.001) at posttest compared to pretest. However, the women in the control group reported a lower general self-efficacy at posttest compared to pretest (t = 2.86, P =.006). Women in the experimental group reported significantly higher satisfaction levels with antenatal care than those in the control group. Discussion: A web-based antenatal care and education system can improve pregnancy-related stress and general self-efficacy among pregnant women. Integrating health care with web-based or internet-based interventions may improve the quality of antenatal care.

AB - Introduction: Women may experience significant stress during pregnancy, and antenatal care and education provide a means to address this. E-health, the use of computer and information technology for health care, has been incorporated into antenatal care and education, but e-health has not been evaluated for its usefulness in addressing stress. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a web-based antenatal care and education system on pregnancy-related stress, general self-efficacy, and satisfaction with antenatal care. Methods: A quasi-experimental design enrolled pregnant women at 16 to 24 weeks’ gestation with a low-risk pregnancy. Women in the control group (n = 67) received routine antenatal care; women in the experimental group (n = 68) also received a web-based antenatal care and education program in the second trimester. Pregnancy stress and general self-efficacy were assessed at study entry and again at 36 to 38 weeks’ gestation; satisfaction with care was assessed at the study endpoint. Results: When the pretest scores were controlled, the women in the experimental group reported significantly lower pregnancy-related stress (F = 12.9, P <.001) and significantly higher self-efficacy (F = 17.61, P <.001) than did the women in the control group. Women in the experimental group reported lower pregnancy-related stress (t = 5.09, P <.001) and a higher general self-efficacy (t = −3.17, P =.001) at posttest compared to pretest. However, the women in the control group reported a lower general self-efficacy at posttest compared to pretest (t = 2.86, P =.006). Women in the experimental group reported significantly higher satisfaction levels with antenatal care than those in the control group. Discussion: A web-based antenatal care and education system can improve pregnancy-related stress and general self-efficacy among pregnant women. Integrating health care with web-based or internet-based interventions may improve the quality of antenatal care.

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