Effects of exposure to ambient and indoor fungal spores on reporting childhood respiratory health in Taiwan

Huey-Jen Su, Nai Yun Hsu, Pei Chih Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the associations between total fungal exposures, both from outdoor and indoor environments, and reporting childhood respiratory symptoms in Taiwan. Twenty-two children, living within 10-km diameter of stationary monitoring sites for ambient fungal spores, were enrolled for household sampling, and asked to keep their health diaries and time-activity patterns everyday for the corresponding week. Results showed that statistically significant association was found between the reporting frequency of sneeze and total exposure of airborne Penicillium/Aspergillus (OR=30.67, 95%CI=2.46-1651.41) after adjusting for the episode of fever, child's age and gender. The significance remained after taking into account the exposure levels of all other indoor pollutants measured, including CO2 (OR=41.76, 95%CI=3.31-2274.04). A significant and steady effect of both outdoor and indoor total fungal exposure was demonstrated on reporting adverse respiratory health in children of Taiwan.

Original languageEnglish
JournalIAQ Conference
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Dec 1
EventHealthy and Sustainable Buildings Conference, IAQ 2007 - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: 2007 Oct 152007 Oct 17

Fingerprint

Fungal Spores
Taiwan
Health
Aspergillus
Penicillium
Medical Records
Fever
Sampling
Monitoring
Child Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Building and Construction
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Effects of exposure to ambient and indoor fungal spores on reporting childhood respiratory health in Taiwan",
abstract = "This study aimed to examine the associations between total fungal exposures, both from outdoor and indoor environments, and reporting childhood respiratory symptoms in Taiwan. Twenty-two children, living within 10-km diameter of stationary monitoring sites for ambient fungal spores, were enrolled for household sampling, and asked to keep their health diaries and time-activity patterns everyday for the corresponding week. Results showed that statistically significant association was found between the reporting frequency of sneeze and total exposure of airborne Penicillium/Aspergillus (OR=30.67, 95{\%}CI=2.46-1651.41) after adjusting for the episode of fever, child's age and gender. The significance remained after taking into account the exposure levels of all other indoor pollutants measured, including CO2 (OR=41.76, 95{\%}CI=3.31-2274.04). A significant and steady effect of both outdoor and indoor total fungal exposure was demonstrated on reporting adverse respiratory health in children of Taiwan.",
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Effects of exposure to ambient and indoor fungal spores on reporting childhood respiratory health in Taiwan. / Su, Huey-Jen; Hsu, Nai Yun; Wu, Pei Chih.

In: IAQ Conference, 01.12.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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