Effects of Home-Based Supportive Care on Improvements in Physical Function and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stroke: A Meta-Analysis

Hui Chuan Huang, Yi Chieh Huang, Mei-Feng Lin, Wen Hsuan Hou, Meei Ling Shyu, Hsiao Yean Chiu, Hsiu Ju Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine the effects of home-based supportive care on improvements in physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. Data Sources Seven electronic databases (eg, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAL, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ProQuest, and Google Scholar) and 4 Chinese databases (eg, WANFANG MED ONLINE, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, and National Central Library) were fully searched for all relevant articles up to June 25, 2016. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of home-based supportive care on physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke were included. Finally, 16 articles in Chinese (n=4) and English (n=12) met the inclusion criteria. Data Extraction Data on patient characteristics, study characteristics, intervention details, and outcome were extracted. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data Synthesis Home-based supportive care had a small size effect on physical function (Hedges' g=.17; 95% confidence interval,.09–.26) and a moderate size effect on depressive symptoms (Hedges' g=−.44; 95% confidence interval, −.83 to −.05) in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The moderator analysis revealed that some components of study participants and intervention programs improved the effects on physical function and depressive symptoms; however, no significant moderators were further identified to have superiorly improved physical function and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Regular performance of home-based supportive interventions should be considered for inclusion as routine care for managing and improving physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The present findings provide further evidence with which to design appropriate supportive interventions for home-dwelling stroke survivors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1666-1677.e1
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume98
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Aug 1

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Meta-Analysis
Stroke
Depression
Databases
Confidence Intervals
Information Storage and Retrieval
PubMed
MEDLINE
Libraries
Survivors
China
Randomized Controlled Trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Huang, Hui Chuan ; Huang, Yi Chieh ; Lin, Mei-Feng ; Hou, Wen Hsuan ; Shyu, Meei Ling ; Chiu, Hsiao Yean ; Chang, Hsiu Ju. / Effects of Home-Based Supportive Care on Improvements in Physical Function and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stroke : A Meta-Analysis. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2017 ; Vol. 98, No. 8. pp. 1666-1677.e1.
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title = "Effects of Home-Based Supportive Care on Improvements in Physical Function and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stroke: A Meta-Analysis",
abstract = "Objective To examine the effects of home-based supportive care on improvements in physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. Data Sources Seven electronic databases (eg, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAL, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ProQuest, and Google Scholar) and 4 Chinese databases (eg, WANFANG MED ONLINE, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, and National Central Library) were fully searched for all relevant articles up to June 25, 2016. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of home-based supportive care on physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke were included. Finally, 16 articles in Chinese (n=4) and English (n=12) met the inclusion criteria. Data Extraction Data on patient characteristics, study characteristics, intervention details, and outcome were extracted. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data Synthesis Home-based supportive care had a small size effect on physical function (Hedges' g=.17; 95{\%} confidence interval,.09–.26) and a moderate size effect on depressive symptoms (Hedges' g=−.44; 95{\%} confidence interval, −.83 to −.05) in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The moderator analysis revealed that some components of study participants and intervention programs improved the effects on physical function and depressive symptoms; however, no significant moderators were further identified to have superiorly improved physical function and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Regular performance of home-based supportive interventions should be considered for inclusion as routine care for managing and improving physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The present findings provide further evidence with which to design appropriate supportive interventions for home-dwelling stroke survivors.",
author = "Huang, {Hui Chuan} and Huang, {Yi Chieh} and Mei-Feng Lin and Hou, {Wen Hsuan} and Shyu, {Meei Ling} and Chiu, {Hsiao Yean} and Chang, {Hsiu Ju}",
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Effects of Home-Based Supportive Care on Improvements in Physical Function and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stroke : A Meta-Analysis. / Huang, Hui Chuan; Huang, Yi Chieh; Lin, Mei-Feng; Hou, Wen Hsuan; Shyu, Meei Ling; Chiu, Hsiao Yean; Chang, Hsiu Ju.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 98, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 1666-1677.e1.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of Home-Based Supportive Care on Improvements in Physical Function and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stroke

T2 - A Meta-Analysis

AU - Huang, Hui Chuan

AU - Huang, Yi Chieh

AU - Lin, Mei-Feng

AU - Hou, Wen Hsuan

AU - Shyu, Meei Ling

AU - Chiu, Hsiao Yean

AU - Chang, Hsiu Ju

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Objective To examine the effects of home-based supportive care on improvements in physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. Data Sources Seven electronic databases (eg, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAL, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ProQuest, and Google Scholar) and 4 Chinese databases (eg, WANFANG MED ONLINE, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, and National Central Library) were fully searched for all relevant articles up to June 25, 2016. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of home-based supportive care on physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke were included. Finally, 16 articles in Chinese (n=4) and English (n=12) met the inclusion criteria. Data Extraction Data on patient characteristics, study characteristics, intervention details, and outcome were extracted. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data Synthesis Home-based supportive care had a small size effect on physical function (Hedges' g=.17; 95% confidence interval,.09–.26) and a moderate size effect on depressive symptoms (Hedges' g=−.44; 95% confidence interval, −.83 to −.05) in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The moderator analysis revealed that some components of study participants and intervention programs improved the effects on physical function and depressive symptoms; however, no significant moderators were further identified to have superiorly improved physical function and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Regular performance of home-based supportive interventions should be considered for inclusion as routine care for managing and improving physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The present findings provide further evidence with which to design appropriate supportive interventions for home-dwelling stroke survivors.

AB - Objective To examine the effects of home-based supportive care on improvements in physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. Data Sources Seven electronic databases (eg, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAL, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ProQuest, and Google Scholar) and 4 Chinese databases (eg, WANFANG MED ONLINE, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, and National Central Library) were fully searched for all relevant articles up to June 25, 2016. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of home-based supportive care on physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke were included. Finally, 16 articles in Chinese (n=4) and English (n=12) met the inclusion criteria. Data Extraction Data on patient characteristics, study characteristics, intervention details, and outcome were extracted. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data Synthesis Home-based supportive care had a small size effect on physical function (Hedges' g=.17; 95% confidence interval,.09–.26) and a moderate size effect on depressive symptoms (Hedges' g=−.44; 95% confidence interval, −.83 to −.05) in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The moderator analysis revealed that some components of study participants and intervention programs improved the effects on physical function and depressive symptoms; however, no significant moderators were further identified to have superiorly improved physical function and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Regular performance of home-based supportive interventions should be considered for inclusion as routine care for managing and improving physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The present findings provide further evidence with which to design appropriate supportive interventions for home-dwelling stroke survivors.

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