Effects of incorporating augmented reality into a board game for high school students’ learning motivation and acceptance in health education

Hao Chiang Koong Lin, Yu Hsuan Lin, Tao Hua Wang, Lun Ke Su, Yueh Min Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In traditional schools, where education and teaching tend to be subject-oriented, the standardization of the teaching materials of health education courses would be obscurely related to know-how of daily life. This frustrates the learners from developing the awareness of engagement, thereby decreasing their willingness to acquire new information or skill. Therefore, in this study, a board game assimilating augmented reality (AR) into health education is presented. It associates the card game, slides, and learning sheets gamification teaching model with the learning experience; and proposes the efficacy of the board games mingled with augmented reality to enhance the motivation in learning and confidence in technology. In this experiment for a health education board game, 52 high school students participated in this experiment. There were 25 in the experimental group (with AR) and 27 in the control group (without AR). The IMMS (instructional material motivation survey) and the TAM (technology acceptance model) are applied to acquire quantitative data for examination. The findings are as follows: (1) The acceptance was significantly affected by the integration of AR into the health education board game and (2) the learning motivation was significantly affected by the integration of AR into the health education board game.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3333
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Mar 2

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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