Effects of pontic span and fiber reinforcement on fracture strength of multi-unit provisional fixed partial dentures

Min Chieh Chang, Chun Cheng Hung, Wen Cheng Chen, Shang Chun Tseng, Yung-Chung Chen, Jen Chyan Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/purpose: Clinically, PMMA resin is extensively used for fabricating provisional FPDs. However, fracture often occurs due to the unsatisfactory mechanical strength, especially within connectors of long-span provisional FPDs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the fracture load of fiber-reinforced provisional FPDs with various pontic span lengths, and to identify the most suitable span length for fiber-reinforced long-span provisional FPDs. Materials and methods: Fifty-six provisional FPDs with various pontic span lengths were fabricated. Seven samples from each group were reinforced with glass fibers. Unreinforced counterparts served as control. The samples were fixed on the abutments after thermocycling and then received a fatigue test. Subsequently, they were mechanically loaded until fracture, and the initial fracture load and fracture patterns were recorded. Statistical analysis, including two-sample t-test, one-way, two-way ANOVA, Tukey-Kramer HSD post hoc analysis and χ2 test were used to evaluate mechanical performance. Results: The mean fracture load of FPDs with 14 mm pontic span length is significantly higher than the other lengths. The fracture load of each reinforced group is significantly higher than each counterpart control. There is no interaction between two variables, pontic span and fiber reinforcement. With fiber reinforcement, the fracture patterns were altered from catastrophic fracture to bent or partial fracture. But, the fracture patterns were not affected by pontic span. Conclusion: The fracture load of acrylic FPDs decreases significantly when pontic span length is greater than 17 mm. Adding glass fibers into long-span provisional FPDs can significantly improve the fracture resistance and fracture patterns.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-317
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Dental Sciences
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Sep 1

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Fixed Partial Denture
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Fatigue
Analysis of Variance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

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Chang, Min Chieh ; Hung, Chun Cheng ; Chen, Wen Cheng ; Tseng, Shang Chun ; Chen, Yung-Chung ; Wang, Jen Chyan. / Effects of pontic span and fiber reinforcement on fracture strength of multi-unit provisional fixed partial dentures. In: Journal of Dental Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 309-317.
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abstract = "Background/purpose: Clinically, PMMA resin is extensively used for fabricating provisional FPDs. However, fracture often occurs due to the unsatisfactory mechanical strength, especially within connectors of long-span provisional FPDs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the fracture load of fiber-reinforced provisional FPDs with various pontic span lengths, and to identify the most suitable span length for fiber-reinforced long-span provisional FPDs. Materials and methods: Fifty-six provisional FPDs with various pontic span lengths were fabricated. Seven samples from each group were reinforced with glass fibers. Unreinforced counterparts served as control. The samples were fixed on the abutments after thermocycling and then received a fatigue test. Subsequently, they were mechanically loaded until fracture, and the initial fracture load and fracture patterns were recorded. Statistical analysis, including two-sample t-test, one-way, two-way ANOVA, Tukey-Kramer HSD post hoc analysis and χ2 test were used to evaluate mechanical performance. Results: The mean fracture load of FPDs with 14 mm pontic span length is significantly higher than the other lengths. The fracture load of each reinforced group is significantly higher than each counterpart control. There is no interaction between two variables, pontic span and fiber reinforcement. With fiber reinforcement, the fracture patterns were altered from catastrophic fracture to bent or partial fracture. But, the fracture patterns were not affected by pontic span. Conclusion: The fracture load of acrylic FPDs decreases significantly when pontic span length is greater than 17 mm. Adding glass fibers into long-span provisional FPDs can significantly improve the fracture resistance and fracture patterns.",
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Effects of pontic span and fiber reinforcement on fracture strength of multi-unit provisional fixed partial dentures. / Chang, Min Chieh; Hung, Chun Cheng; Chen, Wen Cheng; Tseng, Shang Chun; Chen, Yung-Chung; Wang, Jen Chyan.

In: Journal of Dental Sciences, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 309-317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of pontic span and fiber reinforcement on fracture strength of multi-unit provisional fixed partial dentures

AU - Chang, Min Chieh

AU - Hung, Chun Cheng

AU - Chen, Wen Cheng

AU - Tseng, Shang Chun

AU - Chen, Yung-Chung

AU - Wang, Jen Chyan

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - Background/purpose: Clinically, PMMA resin is extensively used for fabricating provisional FPDs. However, fracture often occurs due to the unsatisfactory mechanical strength, especially within connectors of long-span provisional FPDs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the fracture load of fiber-reinforced provisional FPDs with various pontic span lengths, and to identify the most suitable span length for fiber-reinforced long-span provisional FPDs. Materials and methods: Fifty-six provisional FPDs with various pontic span lengths were fabricated. Seven samples from each group were reinforced with glass fibers. Unreinforced counterparts served as control. The samples were fixed on the abutments after thermocycling and then received a fatigue test. Subsequently, they were mechanically loaded until fracture, and the initial fracture load and fracture patterns were recorded. Statistical analysis, including two-sample t-test, one-way, two-way ANOVA, Tukey-Kramer HSD post hoc analysis and χ2 test were used to evaluate mechanical performance. Results: The mean fracture load of FPDs with 14 mm pontic span length is significantly higher than the other lengths. The fracture load of each reinforced group is significantly higher than each counterpart control. There is no interaction between two variables, pontic span and fiber reinforcement. With fiber reinforcement, the fracture patterns were altered from catastrophic fracture to bent or partial fracture. But, the fracture patterns were not affected by pontic span. Conclusion: The fracture load of acrylic FPDs decreases significantly when pontic span length is greater than 17 mm. Adding glass fibers into long-span provisional FPDs can significantly improve the fracture resistance and fracture patterns.

AB - Background/purpose: Clinically, PMMA resin is extensively used for fabricating provisional FPDs. However, fracture often occurs due to the unsatisfactory mechanical strength, especially within connectors of long-span provisional FPDs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the fracture load of fiber-reinforced provisional FPDs with various pontic span lengths, and to identify the most suitable span length for fiber-reinforced long-span provisional FPDs. Materials and methods: Fifty-six provisional FPDs with various pontic span lengths were fabricated. Seven samples from each group were reinforced with glass fibers. Unreinforced counterparts served as control. The samples were fixed on the abutments after thermocycling and then received a fatigue test. Subsequently, they were mechanically loaded until fracture, and the initial fracture load and fracture patterns were recorded. Statistical analysis, including two-sample t-test, one-way, two-way ANOVA, Tukey-Kramer HSD post hoc analysis and χ2 test were used to evaluate mechanical performance. Results: The mean fracture load of FPDs with 14 mm pontic span length is significantly higher than the other lengths. The fracture load of each reinforced group is significantly higher than each counterpart control. There is no interaction between two variables, pontic span and fiber reinforcement. With fiber reinforcement, the fracture patterns were altered from catastrophic fracture to bent or partial fracture. But, the fracture patterns were not affected by pontic span. Conclusion: The fracture load of acrylic FPDs decreases significantly when pontic span length is greater than 17 mm. Adding glass fibers into long-span provisional FPDs can significantly improve the fracture resistance and fracture patterns.

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EP - 317

JO - Journal of Dental Sciences

JF - Journal of Dental Sciences

SN - 1991-7902

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