Effects of the ionosphere and solar activity on radio occultation signals: Application to CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload satellite observations

A. G. Pavelyev, Y. A. Liou, J. Wickert, T. Schmidt, A. A. Pavelyev, S. F. Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We analyze the ionospheric effect on the phase and amplitude of radio occultation (RO) signal. The introduced theoretical model predicts a correlation between the phase acceleration and intensity variations of RO signal and opens a way to locate layered structures in the propagation medium, in particular, in trans-ionospheric satellite-to-satellite links. For considered CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) RO events, the locations of the inclined plasma layers in the lower ionosphere are estimated, and the electron density distribution is retrieved. By analysis of the CHAMP RO data, we reveal the dependence of the intensity variations of RO signal on sharp changes in the DST index and on the local time. Maps of the seasonal, geographical, and temporal distributions of the CHAMP RO events with amplitude scintillations, having high S4 index values, and observed during the years 2001-2004 indicate dependence on solar activity. As follows from this analysis, the GPS signals in the trans-ionospheric links can be used for investigating the location and parameters of inclined plasma layers and monitoring the influence of solar activity on the ionosphere with global coverage.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberA06326
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Volume112
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jun 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

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