Efforts to reduce the door-to-needle time of thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke: Video-assisted therapeutic risk communication

Cheng Yang Hsieh, Wei Fen Chen, Chih Hung Chen, Chih Yuan Wang, Chien Jung Chen, Edward Chia Cheng Lai, Tsang Shan Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Purpose: Explaining the risks and benefits of recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rtPA) to eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) within a few minutes is important but difficult. We examined whether a new thrombolysis program can decrease the door-to-needle (DTN) time when treating patients with AIS. Methods: A new rtPA thrombolysis program with video assistance was adapted for patients with AIS and their families. We retrospectively compared outcome quality before (2009-2011) and after (2012) the program began. Outcomes included DTN time, the percentage of rtPA thrombolysis within 3 hours of onset in all hospitalized patients with AIS who presented within 2 hours of onset (2hr%) and the percentage of rtPA thrombolysis in all hospitalized patients with AIS (AIS%). Results: We recruited patients with AIS who had undergone thrombolytic therapy before (. n=18) and after (. n=14) the initiation of the new program. DTN time decreased (93±24 minutes to 57±14 minutes, p<0.001) and the AIS% increased (2% to 5%, p=0.010) after the program. The 2hr% marginally significantly increased (18% to 33%, p=0.080). Conclusion: A thrombolysis program with video-assisted therapeutic risk communication decreased DTN time and increased the treatment rate of patients with AIS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)929-933
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Formosan Medical Association
Volume113
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Dec 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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