Electronic quantum trajectories in a quantum dot

Ciann-Dong Yang, Shih Ming Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article gives a quantum-trajectory demonstration of the observed electric, magnetic, and thermal effects on a quantum dot with circular or elliptic shape. By applying quantum trajectory method to a quantum dot, we reveal the quantum-mechanical meanings of the classical concepts of backscattering and commensurability, which were used in the literature to explain the peak locations of the magnetoresistance curve. Under the quantum commensurability condition, electronic quantum trajectories in a circular quantum dot are shown to be stationary like a standing wave, whose presence increases the electrical resistance. A hidden quantum effect called magnetic stagnation is discovered and shown to be the main cause of the observed jumps of the magnetoresistance curve. Quantum trajectories in an elliptic quantum dot are found to be chaotic and an index of chaos called Lyapunov exponent is proposed to measure the irregularity of the various quantum trajectories. It is shown that the response of the Lyapunov exponent to the applied magnetic field captures the main features of the experimental magnetoresistance curve. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Under quantum commensurability conditions, electronic quantum trajectories in a quantum dot are found to be stationary like a standing wave, whose presence increases the electrical resistance. The number of waves distributed on the circumference of the quantum dot can be controlled by the applied magnetic field. The quantum trajectory method elucidates how the electrical resistance of a quantum dot changes with respect to the applied magnetic field and temperature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)920-930
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Quantum Chemistry
Volume114
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jul 15

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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