Endemic hepatitis c virus infection in a seaboard village of southwestern taiwan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This study investigated the rate of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and identified the risk factors associated with a HCV infection at Ma-Sha-Gou, a sea board village in south western Taiwan. In total, 240 subjects were sampled and stratified according to age and sex from 1,200 residents aged 20˜64 years old. HCV-specific antibodies (anti-HCV Ab) in blood specimens were tested for HCV seropositive by the third-generation HCV ELISA system. The subjects, later identified as 152 seropositive and 88 seronegative, were selected for analysis of the correlates of HCV infection. They were interviewed to explore a variety of possible risk factors for HCV infection with a structured questionnaire. The results showed that the anti-HCV age-adjusted seroprevalence was 55.8%. Needle injection was significant to the increased anti-HCV seroprevalence, with multivariate age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) and confidence interval (CI) of 1.9 and 1.2 ˜ 3.9 respectively. This study identifies Ma-Sha-Gou as an endemic area of HCV infection, in which needle injection from any medical activity was a possible transmission pathway in the village, and suggests the health authorities/community health nurses should give there sidents a comprehensive community-based education program to interrupt HCV transmission.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-252
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nursing Research
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Jan 1

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Hepatitis Viruses
Virus Diseases
Taiwan
Hepacivirus
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Needles
Community Health Nurses
Injections
Oceans and Seas
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

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title = "Endemic hepatitis c virus infection in a seaboard village of southwestern taiwan",
abstract = "This study investigated the rate of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and identified the risk factors associated with a HCV infection at Ma-Sha-Gou, a sea board village in south western Taiwan. In total, 240 subjects were sampled and stratified according to age and sex from 1,200 residents aged 20˜64 years old. HCV-specific antibodies (anti-HCV Ab) in blood specimens were tested for HCV seropositive by the third-generation HCV ELISA system. The subjects, later identified as 152 seropositive and 88 seronegative, were selected for analysis of the correlates of HCV infection. They were interviewed to explore a variety of possible risk factors for HCV infection with a structured questionnaire. The results showed that the anti-HCV age-adjusted seroprevalence was 55.8{\%}. Needle injection was significant to the increased anti-HCV seroprevalence, with multivariate age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) and confidence interval (CI) of 1.9 and 1.2 ˜ 3.9 respectively. This study identifies Ma-Sha-Gou as an endemic area of HCV infection, in which needle injection from any medical activity was a possible transmission pathway in the village, and suggests the health authorities/community health nurses should give there sidents a comprehensive community-based education program to interrupt HCV transmission.",
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Endemic hepatitis c virus infection in a seaboard village of southwestern taiwan. / Wang, Chi-Jen; Chang, Ying-Ju; Yeh, Li Ly; Chang, Ting-Tsung.

In: Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.01.2002, p. 246-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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