Enhancing biological properties of porous coatings through the incorporation of manganese

Yen Ting Liu, Kuan Chen Kung, Tzer-Min Lee, Truan-Sheng Lui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys are bio-inert materials ideally suited to the fabrication of dental and orthopedic implants. A number of surface modifications have been proposed to enhance the bioactivity of the titanium surface. Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) has proven to be a simple, controllable, and costeffective process for the fabrication of porous oxide coatings. In a previous study, a porous 3D structure comprising calcium and phosphate improved the biocompatibility of titanium. Nonetheless, the biological behavior of coatings, such as differentiation, is important for successful osseointegration. Because manganese has been shown to have advantageous effects on osteoblastic cell differentiation and bone metabolism, this study investigated whether manganese-containing MAO coatings could improve the biological performances of titanium implants. EDX, ICP-OES, and XPS analysis demonstrated that manganese was successfully incorporated within the MAO coatings. TF-XRD results showed that the phases of the coatings were anatase, rutile, and titanium. SEM results demonstrated that the addition of manganese produced coatings with continuous uniformity while preserving the topography. Additionally, manganese-containing coatings induced higher bone-related gene expression than that afforded by standard MAO coatings in a culture of osteoblastic cells. This indicates that manganese could improve cellmediated mineralization. Our findings suggest that incorporating manganese within MAO coatings leads to the formation of a porous 3D topography which is capable of improving osteoblastic cell differentiation. Thus, the proposed Mn-MAO coating shows considerable promise as a biomaterial for implants with enhanced biological properties.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-467
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Alloys and Compounds
Volume581
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Manganese
Coatings
Titanium
Oxidation
Topography
Bone
Fabrication
Orthopedics
Biocompatible Materials
Bioactivity
Biocompatibility
Titanium alloys
Metabolism
Gene expression
Biomaterials
Titanium dioxide
Oxides
Surface treatment
Energy dispersive spectroscopy
Calcium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys are bio-inert materials ideally suited to the fabrication of dental and orthopedic implants. A number of surface modifications have been proposed to enhance the bioactivity of the titanium surface. Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) has proven to be a simple, controllable, and costeffective process for the fabrication of porous oxide coatings. In a previous study, a porous 3D structure comprising calcium and phosphate improved the biocompatibility of titanium. Nonetheless, the biological behavior of coatings, such as differentiation, is important for successful osseointegration. Because manganese has been shown to have advantageous effects on osteoblastic cell differentiation and bone metabolism, this study investigated whether manganese-containing MAO coatings could improve the biological performances of titanium implants. EDX, ICP-OES, and XPS analysis demonstrated that manganese was successfully incorporated within the MAO coatings. TF-XRD results showed that the phases of the coatings were anatase, rutile, and titanium. SEM results demonstrated that the addition of manganese produced coatings with continuous uniformity while preserving the topography. Additionally, manganese-containing coatings induced higher bone-related gene expression than that afforded by standard MAO coatings in a culture of osteoblastic cells. This indicates that manganese could improve cellmediated mineralization. Our findings suggest that incorporating manganese within MAO coatings leads to the formation of a porous 3D topography which is capable of improving osteoblastic cell differentiation. Thus, the proposed Mn-MAO coating shows considerable promise as a biomaterial for implants with enhanced biological properties.",
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Enhancing biological properties of porous coatings through the incorporation of manganese. / Liu, Yen Ting; Kung, Kuan Chen; Lee, Tzer-Min; Lui, Truan-Sheng.

In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Vol. 581, 01.01.2013, p. 459-467.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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