Epidemiology and clinical manifestations of children with macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in Taiwan

Ping Sheng Wu, Luan Yin Chang, Hsiao Chuan Lin, Hsin Chi, Yu Chia Hsieh, Yi Chuan Huang, Ching Chuan Liu, Yhu Chering Huang, Li Min Huang

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43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mycoplasma pneumoniae accounts for 10-30% of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children. This study reveals the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of children with macrolide-resistant (MLr) M. pneumoniae pneumonia in Taiwan. Respiratory tract specimens were collected from children hospitalized with CAP for evaluation via PCR followed by DNA sequencing for several point mutations related to the MLr character. Of the 412 specimens collected during the study period, 60 (15%) were positive for M. pneumoniae, 14 (23%) of which presented point mutation (all A2063G) in 23S rRNA. Clinical symptoms and chest X-ray findings between the MLs and MLr groups were not significantly different. However, the ML r group had longer mean duration of fever after azithromycin treatment (3.2 days vs. 1.6 days, P = 0.02) and significantly higher percentage of changing antibiotics for suspected MLr strain (42% vs. 13%, P = 0.04). Although 58% of children in the MLr group did not receive effective antibiotics, all children were discharged without sequelae. In conclusion, 15% of CAP in children is caused by M. pneumoniae and the macrolide-resistance rate is 23% in Taiwan. Despite ineffective antibiotics, children with MLr M. pneumoniae pneumonia recover completely. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013; 48:904-911. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)904-911
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Pulmonology
Volume48
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Sep 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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