Evaluation of buoyancy-driven ventilation in atrium buildings using computational fluid dynamics and reduced-scale air model

Pei Chun Liu, Hsien Te Lin, Jung Hua Chou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research focuses on developing a reliable methodology for predicting the performance of buoyancy-driven ventilation in atrium buildings during the design stage using both computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and scale model tests. The results show several features. First, the agreement between CFD simulation and measurement results in the heated zone is better with rng k-ε and zero-equation turbulent schemes; whereas, in the atrium space, the laminar and zero-equation CFD models provide better results. Second, the external ambient temperature has a larger effect on the temperature distribution in the atrium space than the thermal load inside the building. Third, the position of the stack openings that create a direct ventilation path can improve the internal thermal environment. The size of the stack openings also affects the temperature distribution in the atrium space. Lastly, due to the small temperature difference in hot and humid climates, a buoyancy-only ventilation strategy is not very effective in such a situation. That is, when a low-rise atrium building is situated in a hot and humid environment, additional efforts such as wind-driven ventilation, wind-buoyancy ventilation or mechanically driven ventilation will be necessary to achieve the thermal comfort desired.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1970-1979
Number of pages10
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume44
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Sep 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Building and Construction

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