Evidence of a right-shift factor affecting infant hand-use preferences from 7 to 11 months of age as revealed by latent class analysis

George F. Michel, Ching-Fan Sheu, Michele R. Brumley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infant hand-use preferences for apprehending objects were assessed three times at 7, 9, and 11 months of age for 154 infants (79 males) using a reliable and valid procedure. Two classification procedures (differing in Type I classification error rates) were used to identify an infant's preference (right, left, no preference) at each age, and these data were examined using two-and three-group latent class analysis models. These analyses revealed the importance of using a handedness classification procedure with low Type I error rates and evidence of a right-shift factor similar to that expressed in child and adult handedness. Thus, infant hand-use preferences for apprehending objects are likely a developmental precursor of adult handedness. The relation of the right-shift factor to increased susceptibility to social influences during development and the evolution of human abilities also is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Jan 10

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Functional Laterality
Hand
Aptitude
Human Development

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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Evidence of a right-shift factor affecting infant hand-use preferences from 7 to 11 months of age as revealed by latent class analysis. / Michel, George F.; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Brumley, Michele R.

In: Developmental Psychobiology, Vol. 40, No. 1, 10.01.2002, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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